Etymology
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subsistence (n.)

early 15c., "existence, independence," from Late Latin subsistentia "substance, reality," in Medieval Latin also "stability," from Latin subsistens, present participle of subsistere "stand still or firm" (see subsist). Latin subsistentia is a loan-translation of Greek hypostasis "foundation, substance, real nature, subject matter; that which settles at the bottom, sediment," literally "anything set under." In the English word, meaning "act or process of support for physical life" is from 1640s.

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strategy (n.)

1810, "art of a general," from French stratégie (18c.) and directly from Greek strategia "office or command of a general," from strategos "general, commander of an army," also the title of various civil officials and magistrates, from stratos "multitude, army, expedition, encamped army," literally "that which is spread out" (from PIE root *stere- "to spread") + agos "leader," from agein "to lead" (from PIE root *ag- "to drive, draw out or forth, move"). In non-military use from 1887.

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strategic (adj.)

"pertaining to strategy, characterized by strategy," 1807, from French stratégique and directly from Greek strategikos in classical use "of or for a general; fitted for command," from strategos (see strategy). Related: Strategical; strategically (1810).

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strategist (n.)

1838, from French stratégiste, from stratégie (see strategy).

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strategize (v.)

1874, from strategy + -ize. Related: Strategized; strategizing.

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subsistent (adj.)

1520s, from Latin subsistentem (nominative subsistens), present participle of subsistere "stand still or firm" (see subsistence).

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time-out (n.)

also time out, 1896 in sports, 1939 in other occupations; from 1980 as the name of a strategy in child discipline; from time + out.

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deterrence (n.)

1788, "act of deterring; that which deters;" see deterrent + -ence. In a Cold War context (1955), "the strategy of demonstrating the will to inflict punitive damage in hopes of convincing the enemy to refrain from an action." Out of it naturally grew the concept of assured destruction.

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stratagem (n.)

"artifice, trick," late 15c., from French strattegeme, stratagème "trick, especially to outwit an enemy" (15c.), from Italian stratagemma, from Latin strategema "artifice, stratagem," from Greek strategema "the act of a general; military stratagem," from strategein "to be a general, command," from strategos "general" (see strategy). Related: Stratagematic; stratagemical. The second -a- is a Romanic misspelling (compare Spanish estratagema).

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bursar (n.)

"treasurer of a college," 1580s, from Anglo-Latin burser "treasurer" (13c.), from Medieval Latin bursarius "purse-bearer," from bursa "bag, purse" (see purse (n.)). Also, in Scotland, "student in a college who receives an allowance from a fund for his subsistence" (1560s). Related: Bursarial.

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