Etymology
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materia medica (n.)

"substances used in medicine," 1690s, Latin, literally "medical matter."

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in re (prep.)

"in the matter of, in the (legal) case of," c. 1600, probably from Duns Scotus; Latin, from re, ablative of res "property, goods; matter, thing, affair," from Proto-Italic *re-, from PIE *reh-i- "wealth, goods" (source also of Sanskrit rayi- "property, goods," Avestan raii-i- "wealth").

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trompe l'oeil 

1889, French, literally "deceives the eye," from tromper "to deceive," a verb of uncertain origin and the subject of many theories (see trump (v.2)).

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ecce homo 

Latin, literally "behold the man" (John xix.5), from Latin ecce "lo!, behold!" Christ crowned with thorns, especially as the subject of a painting.

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sui juris 

1610s, "of full legal age and capacity," in ancient Rome, "of the status of one not subject to the patria potestas." For first element, see sui generis; for second element, see jurist.

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each other 

reciprocal pronoun, originally in late Old English a phrase, with each as the subject and other inflected (as it were "each to other," "each from other," etc.).

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au fait (adj.)

1743, French, "to the point, to the matter under discussion," literally "to the fact," from au "to the" (see au) + fait "fact" (see feat). Used in French with sense of "acquainted with the facts, expert, fully skilled."

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apo koinu 

Greek, literally "in common." Applied to sentences with one subject and two predicates; a formation rare in modern English, though it occurs more often in Old English. For the elements, see apo- + koine.

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brain trust (n.)

"group of experts assembled to give advice on some matter," occasionally used since early 1900s, it became current in 1933, in reference to the intellectuals gathered by the administration of incoming U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt as advisers; from brain (n.) + trust (n.).

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res 

Latin word once used in various phrases in English, often in legal language, where it means "the condition of something, the matter in hand or point at issue;" literally "thing" (see re). For example res ipsa loquitur "the thing speaks for itself;" res judicata "a point decided by competent authority."

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