Etymology
Advertisement
stress (n.)

c. 1300, "hardship, adversity, force, pressure," in part a shortening of Middle English distress (n.); in part from Old French estrece "narrowness, oppression," from Vulgar Latin *strictia, from Latin strictus "tight, compressed, drawn together," past participle of stringere "draw tight" (see strain (v.)). Meaning "physical strain on a material object" is from mid-15c. As an abstract force in mechanics from 1855. The purely psychological sense is attested from 1955.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
stress (v.)

c. 1300, stressen, "to subject (someone) to force or compulsion," a short form of distress (v.), or else from Old French estrecier, estrescer, from Vulgar Latin *strictiare, from Latin stringere "draw tight," which also is the source of stress (n.). The figurative meaning "put emphasis on" is first recorded 1896, from notion of laying pressure on something by relying on it. Related: Stressed; stressing.

Related entries & more 
stressor (n.)

1950, agent noun in Latin form from stress (v.).

Related entries & more 
unstressed (adj.)

1879, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of stress (v.).

Related entries & more 
stressful (adj.)

1846, from stress (n.) + -ful. Related: Stressfully; stressfulness.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
ictus (n.)

rhythmical or metrical stress, 1752, from Latin ictus "a blow, stroke, thrust;" of voices "a beat, impulse, stress," from icere (past participle ictus) "to strike, hit," which is related to iacere "to throw" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel"). Reckoned in Anglo-Saxon poetry; in Modern English it generally is identical to syllabic stress or accent.

Related entries & more 
accent (v.)
Origin and meaning of accent

"pronounce with accent or stress," 1520s, from French accenter, from Old French acenter "accentuate, stress," from acent (see accent (n.)). The meaning "mark with an accent sign" is from 1660s (implied in accented); the figurative sense of "mark emphatically" is by 1650s. Related: Accenting.

Related entries & more 
emphasize (v.)

"to utter or pronounce with emphasis, lay stress upon; bring out clearly or distinctly," 1765, from emphasis + -ize. Related: Emphasized; emphasizing.

Related entries & more 
increase (n.)

late 14c., "action of increasing; results of an increasing," from increase (v.) or from verbs formed from the noun in Old French or Anglo-French. The stress shifted from 18c. to distinguish it from the verb.

Related entries & more 
offbeat (adj.)

also off-beat, "unusual," 1938, from off (adv.) + beat (n.). From earlier sense in reference to the second and fourth beats in a four-beat music rhythm (1927), where the stress typically fell on the first and third. Compare upbeat.

Related entries & more