Etymology
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stoma (n.)
"orifice, small opening in an animal body," 1680s, Modern Latin, from Greek stoma (genitive stomatos) "mouth; mouthpiece; talk, voice; mouth of a river; any outlet or inlet," from PIE root *stom-en-, denoting various body parts and orifices (source also of Avestan staman- "mouth" (of a dog), Hittite shtamar "mouth," Middle Breton staffn "mouth, jawbone," Cornish stefenic "palate"). Surgical sense is attested from 1937.
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stomatitis (n.)
"inflammation of the interior of the mouth," 1859, from Greek stomato- (befdore vowels stomat-), combining form from stem of stoma "mouth" (see stoma) + -itis "inflammation."
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ostomy (n.)

"surgical operation making a permanent opening in the body," 1957, abstracted from colostomy, etc.; ultimately from Modern Latin stoma "opening, orifice," from Greek stoma "mouth" (see stoma).

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tracheostomy (n.)
1726, from tracheo-, used as a combining form of trachea + -ostomy "artificial opening," from Modern Latin stoma "opening, orifice," from Greek stoma "mouth" (see stoma).
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colostomy (n.)

1888, from combining form of colon (n.2) + Modern Latin -stoma "opening, orifice," from Greek stoma "opening, mouth" (see stoma). Colotomy "operation of making an incision in the colon" is attested from 1860, from Greek tome "a cutting."

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anastomosis (n.)
in anatomy, "union or intercommunication of the vessels of one system with those of another," 1610s, medical Latin, from Greek anastomosis "outlet, opening," from anastomoein "to open, discharge" (as one sea into another), "to furnish with a mouth," from ana "again, anew" (see ana-) + stoma "mouth" (see stoma). Related: Anastomotic.
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prostomium (n.)

in zoology, "the region in front of the mouth of certain invertebrates," 1866 (attested in German by 1857), Latinized form of Greek prostomion "fore-mouth, something before the mouth," from pro "before" (see pro-) + stoma "mouth" (see stoma). Related: Prostomial.

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voice (n.)

late 13c., "sound made by the human mouth," from Old French voiz "voice, speech; word, saying, rumor, report" (Modern French voix), from Latin vocem (nominative vox) "voice, sound, utterance, cry, call, speech, sentence, language, word" (source also of Italian voce, Spanish voz), related to vocare "to call" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak").

Replaced Old English stefn "voice," from Proto-Germanic *stemno, from PIE *stomen- (see stoma). Meaning "ability in a singer" is first attested c. 1600. Meaning "expression of feeling, etc." (in reference to groups of people, etc., such as Voice of America) is recorded from late 14c. Meaning "invisible spirit or force that directs or suggests," (especially in the context of insanity, as in hear voices in (one's) head, is from 1911.

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stomach (n.)

late 14c. variant of earlier stomake (early 14c.), "internal pouch into which food is digested," from Old French stomaque, estomac "stomach," from Latin stomachus "throat, gullet; stomach," also "taste, inclination, liking; distaste, dislike;" also "pride, indignation," which were thought to have their origin in that organ (source also of Spanish estómago, Italian stomaco), from Greek stomachos "throat, gullet, esophagus," literally "mouth, opening," from stoma "mouth" (see stoma).

Applied anciently to the openings of various internal organs, especially that of the stomach, then by the later Greek physicians to the stomach itself. The native word is maw. Some 16c. anatomists tried to correct the sense back to "esophagus" and introduce ventricle for what we call the stomach. Meaning "belly, midriff, part of the body that contains the stomach" is from late 14c.

In Middle English also stomack,stomac, stommak,stomoke; the spelling of the ending of the word was conformed to Latin regularly from 16c., but the pronunciation remains as in Middle English. Related: stomachial (1580s); stomachical (c. 1600); stomachic (1650s). Pugilistic stomacher "punch in the stomach" is from 1814; from mid-15c. as "vest or other garment which covers the belly." The Latin figurative senses also were in Middle English (such as "relish, inclination, desire," mid-15c.) or early Modern English. Also sometimes regarded in Middle Ages as the seat of sexual desire.

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stamen (n.)

"pollen-bearing organ of a flower," 1660s, from Modern Latin (1625, Spigelus), from Latin stamen "stamen" (Pliny), literally "foundation in weaving, thread of the warp" in the upright loom (related to stare "to stand"), from PIE *sta-men- (source also of Greek stēmōn "warp in the upright loom," also used by Hesychius for some part of a plant, Gothic stoma, Sanskrit sthaman "place," also "strength"), from root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." The usual English plural is stamens because of the special use of the classical plural, stamina.

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