Etymology
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stimulant (adj.)
1772, from French stimulant or directly from Latin stimulantem (nominative stimulans), present participle of stimulare "to prick, urge, stimulate" (see stimulation). As a noun from 1794.
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upper (n.)
"part of a shoe above the sole," 1789, from upper (adj.). Sense of "stimulant drug" is from 1968, agent noun from up (v.).
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ibogaine (n.)
nerve stimulant, 1901, from French ibogaine, from iboga, Congolese name of the shrub from which the chemical is extracted, + chemical suffix -ine (2).
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Ritalin (n.)

central nervous system stimulant, a proprietary name (Ciba Ltd., originally in Switzerland) for the drug methylphenidate hydrochloride. It was trademarked 1948, years before the drug itself was marketed.

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methamphetamine (n.)

white crystalline compound that acts as a powerful stimulant to the nervous system, 1949, from methyl + amphetamine; so called because it was a methyl derivative of amphetamine.

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ginseng (n.)
type of plant whose root is highly valued as a tonic and stimulant in Chinese herbology, 1650s, from Chinese jen-shen. First element means "man," but the meaning of the second is obscure.
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urticaria (n.)
"nettle-rash," medical Latin, from Latin urtica "nettle, stinging nettle" (figuratively "spur, incentive, stimulant), from urere "to burn," from PIE root *eus- "to burn" (see ember) + abstract noun ending -ia. Related: Urticarial.
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Betula (n.)
genus of the birches, from Latin betula "birch," from Gaulish betu- "bitumen" (source also of Middle Irish beithe "box tree," Welsh bedwen "birch tree"). According to Pliny, so called because the Gauls extracted tar from birches. Birch tar still is sold as an analgesic and stimulant and made into birch beer by the Pennsylvania Dutch.
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cantharides (n.)
late 14c., cantaride, type of beetle (the "Spanish fly"), especially as dried, ground up, and used medicinally to raise blisters, from Latin plural of cantharis, from Greek kantharis "blister-fly, a kind of beetle." Beekes says this is a derivative of kantharos, also the name of a kind of beetle, for which there is no good etymology. Their use (taken internally) as a sexual stimulant is attested by c. 1600. Related: Cantharic.
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pooch (n.)

"dog," 1917, American English, of unknown origin. Earlier it was a dog name, attested as such by 1901 as the name of a dog owned by Dick Craine, "the Klondike pioneer" (the article in the May 12 Buffalo Courier reports: " 'Pooch' is the Alaskan name for whisky, and although the dog is not addicted to the use of this stimulant, he is a genuine Eskimo dog, and, therefore, it is appropriate"). Harvard coach "Pooch" Donovan also was much in the news during the early years of 20c.

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