Etymology
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offense (n.)

late 14c., "hurt, harm, injury, pain;" also "breach of the law, wrongdoing; transgression against God, sin;" also "the causing of displeasure, act or fact of wounding the feelings of or displeasing another;" also "displeasure, annoyance, umbrage," from Old French ofense "offense, insult, wrong" (13c.) and directly from Latin offensa "an offense, injury, affront, crime," literally "a striking against," noun use of fem. past participle of offendere (see offend).

Meaning "action of attacking" is from c. 1400. Sporting sense of "the team on the attack, at bat, with the ball," etc. is by 1894.

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status (n.)

1670s, "height" of a situation or condition, later "legal standing of a person" (1791), from Latin status "condition, position, state, manner, attitude," from past participle stem of stare "to stand," from PIE *ste-tu-, from root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." Sense of "standing in one's society or profession" is from 1820. Status symbol first recorded 1955; status-seeker from 1956. Status-anxiety is from 1959.

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status quo (n.)

"unaltered condition," 1833, from Latin status quo "the state in which," hence "existing state of affairs." Also status quo ante "the state in which before, state of affairs previous" (1877). Related: Status-quoism.

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miff (v.)

1797, "take offense at;" 1811, "give a slight offense to, put out of humor;" from miff (n.). Related: miffed; miffing.

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waspish (adj.)

"irascible, quick to take offense; spiteful," 1560s, from wasp + -ish. Related: Waspishly; waspishness.

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citizenship (n.)

"status, rights, privileges, and responsibilities of a citizen," 1610s, from citizen + -ship.

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demobilization (n.)

"action of disbanding troops; reduction of military forces to a peace status," 1866 (in reference to the Austro-Prussian War); see de- (privative) + mobilization. Earlier in German.

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sui juris 

1610s, "of full legal age and capacity," in ancient Rome, "of the status of one not subject to the patria potestas." For first element, see sui generis; for second element, see jurist.

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scholarship (n.)

1530s, "status of a scholar," from scholar + -ship. The meaning "learning, erudition, character and qualities of a scholar" is from 1580s; the sense of "source of funds for support or maintenance of a scholar" is from 1580s.

Other nouns in similar senses are or were scholardom "the realm of scholars" (1853); scholarhood "body of scholars" (1837); scholarity, now obsolete, was "status of a scholar" (1590s), and Joyce uses scholarment.

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