Etymology
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lender (n.)

mid-15c., agent noun from lend (v.). Old English had laenere, agent noun from lænan; the Middle English word might be a new formation or it might be the older word with an unetymological -d- from lend.

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status (n.)

1670s, "height" of a situation or condition, later "legal standing of a person" (1791), from Latin status "condition, position, state, manner, attitude," from past participle stem of stare "to stand," from PIE *ste-tu-, from root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." Sense of "standing in one's society or profession" is from 1820. Status symbol first recorded 1955; status-seeker from 1956. Status-anxiety is from 1959.

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status quo (n.)

"unaltered condition," 1833, from Latin status quo "the state in which," hence "existing state of affairs." Also status quo ante "the state in which before, state of affairs previous" (1877). Related: Status-quoism.

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money-lender (n.)

"one who lends money on interest," 1765, from money + lender.

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Shylock (n.)

"usurer, merciless creditor," 1786, from the name of the Jewish money-lender character in Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice" (c. 1596).

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citizenship (n.)

"status, rights, privileges, and responsibilities of a citizen," 1610s, from citizen + -ship.

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creditor (n.)

mid-15c., "one to whom any return is due or payable, one to whom money is owed," from Anglo-French creditour, Old French creditor (early 14c.), from Latin creditor "truster; lender," from creditus, past participle of credere "to believe" (see credo).

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demobilization (n.)

"action of disbanding troops; reduction of military forces to a peace status," 1866 (in reference to the Austro-Prussian War); see de- (privative) + mobilization. Earlier in German.

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usurer (n.)

late 13c., "one who lends money at interest," but later especially "one who lends money at an exorbitant rate of interest," from Anglo-French usurer, Old French usurier, usureor, from Medieval Latin usurarius "money-lender, usurer," from Latin usurarius (adj.) "pertaining to interest; that pays interest," from usura (see usury).

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sui juris 

1610s, "of full legal age and capacity," in ancient Rome, "of the status of one not subject to the patria potestas." For first element, see sui generis; for second element, see jurist.

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