Etymology
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squeeze (v.)
c. 1600, "press forcibly" (transitive), probably an alteration of quease (c. 1550), from Old English cwysan "to squeeze," of unknown origin, perhaps imitative (compare German quetschen "to squeeze"). Perhaps altered by influence of many words of similar sense in squ-. Intransitive sense from 1680s. Baseball squeeze play first recorded 1905. The 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue has squeeze-crab "A sour-looking, shrivelled, diminutive fellow."
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squeeze (n.)
1610s, "act of squeezing," from squeeze (v.). Main squeeze "most important person" is attested from 1896; meaning "one's sweetheart, lover" is attested by 1980. Slang expression to put the squeeze on (someone or something) "exert influence on" is from 1711.
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squeegee (n.)

"wooden scraping instrument with a rubber blade," 1844, a nautical word originally, earlier squilgee, squillagee (Dana, 1840), "a small swab made of untwisted yarns. Figuratively, a lazy mean fellow" [Smythe], perhaps from squeege "to press" (1782), an alteration of squeeze (v.). Later in photography, then window-washing.

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pancake (v.)
"to squeeze flat," 1879, from pancake (n.). Later, of aircraft, "to fall flat" (1911), with figurative extension. Related: Pancaked; pancaking.
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scrunch (v.)
1825, "to bite," intensive form of crunch (v.); ultimately imitative. Meaning "to squeeze" is recorded from 1835 (implied in scrunched). Related: Scrunching.
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squish (v.)
1640s, probably a variant of squash (v.), perhaps by influence of obsolete squiss "to squeeze or crush" (1550s). Related: Squished; squishing.
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kvetch (v.)
"to complain, whine," 1953 (implied in kvetching), from Yiddish kvetshn, literally "squeeze, press," from German quetsche "crusher, presser." As a noun, from 1936 as a term of abuse for a person.
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tapioca (n.)
1640s, tipiaca, from Portuguese or Spanish tapioca, from Tupi (Brazil) tipioca "juice of a pressed cassava," from tipi "residue, dregs" + og, ok "to squeeze out" (from roots of the cassava plant).
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ileus (n.)
painful intestinal condition, 1706, from Latin ileus "severe colic," from Greek eileos "colic," from eilein "to turn, squeeze," from PIE root *wel- (3) "to turn, revolve."
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