Etymology
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spurious (adj.)
1590s, "born out of wedlock," from Latin spurius "illegitimate, false" (source also of Italian spurio, Spanish espurio), from spurius (n.) "illegitimate child," probably from Etruscan spural "public." Sense of "having an irregular origin, not properly constituted" is from c. 1600; that of "false, sham" is from 1610s; of writing, etc., "not proceeding from the source pretended, 1620s. Related: Spuriously; spuriousness.
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relationship (n.)

1640s, "sense or state of being related" by kindred, affinity, or other alliance, from relation + -ship. Specifically of romantic or sexual intimacy by 1944.

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interrelationship (n.)
also inter-relationship, "state of being interrelated," 1841, from inter- "between" + relationship.
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Hindi (adj.)

1825, from Hind "India" (see Hindu) + -i, suffix expressing relationship. As the name of a modern language of India, 1880.

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kinship (n.)
by 1764, from kin + -ship. Relationship covers the same sense but is a hybrid.
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gesellschaft (n.)
1887, "social relationship based on duty to society or an organization," from German Gesellschaft, from geselle "companion" + -schaft "-ship."
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bogus (adj.)

"counterfeit, spurious, sham," 1839, from noun (1838) meaning "counterfeit money, spurious coin," American English slang, apparently from a word applied (according to OED first in Ohio in 1827) to a counterfeiter's apparatus.

One bogus or machine impressing dies on the coin, with a number of dies, engraving tools, bank bill paper, spurious coin, &c. &c. making in all a large wagon load, was taken into possession by the attorney general of Lower Canada. [Niles' Register, Sept. 7, 1833, quoting from the Concord, New Hampshire, Statesman of Aug. 24]

Some trace this to tantrabobus, also tantrabogus, a late 18c. colloquial Vermont word for any odd-looking object (in later 19c. use "the devil"), which might be connected to tantarabobs, recorded as a Devonshire name for the devil. Others trace it to the same source as bogey (n.1). Related: Bogusly; bogusness.

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coevolution (n.)
also co-evolution, 1965, from co- + evolution; supposedly introduced by Paul Ehrlich and Peter Raven in a study of the relationship between caterpillars and plants.
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pseudo (n.)

late 14c., "false or spurious thing," especially "person falsely claiming divine authority," from Medieval Latin; see pseudo-. In modern use, of things, "imitated and exaggerated;" of persons, "pretentious, insincere," from 1945; as a noun in the modern sense from 1959. Related: Pseudish.

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unrelated (adj.)
1660s, "not akin," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of relate (v.). Meaning "not in any relationship" is attested from 1660s; that of "not told" is from 1764.
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