Etymology
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spontaneous (adj.)
1650s, "occurring without external stimulus," from Late Latin spontaneus "willing, of one's free will," from Latin (sua) sponte "of one's own accord, willingly," a word of uncertain origin. Related: Spontaneously; spontaneousness. Used earlier of persons and characters, with a sense "acting of one's own accord" (c. 1200). Spontaneous combustion first attested 1795. Spontaneous generation (the phrase, not the feat) attested from 1650s.
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spontaneity (n.)
1650s, from French spontanéité or a native formation from spontaneous + -ity.
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motile (adj.)

"capable of spontaneous movement," 1831, back-formation from motility.

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instantaneous (adj.)
1650s, from instant (n.) on model of spontaneous, etc. Related: Instantaneously (1640s); instantaneousness; instantaneity.
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untaught (adj.)
mid-14c., "not instructed or educated," from un- (1) "not" + taught. Hence "spontaneous, natural" (mid-15c.).
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abiogenesis (n.)
"spontaneous generation" (of life, without parent organisms), 1870, coined in Modern Latin by T.H. Huxley, from a- (3) + biogenesis.
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motility (n.)

"capacity of automatic or spontaneous movement," 1827, from French motilité (1827), from Latin mot-, stem of movere "to move" (from PIE root *meue- "to push away").

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forced (adj.)
"not spontaneous or voluntary, strained, unnatural," 1570s, past-participle adjective from force (v.). Meaning "effected by an unusual application of force" is from 1590s. Related: Forcedly. The flier's forced landing attested by 1917.
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happening (n.)
mid-15c., "chance, luck," verbal noun from happen (v.); meaning "an occurrence" is 1550s. Sense of "spontaneous event or display" is from 1959 in the argot of artists. Happenings "events" was noted by Fowler as a vogue word from c. 1905.
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gratuitous (adj.)

1650s, "freely bestowed," from Latin gratuitus "done without pay, spontaneous, voluntary," from gratus "pleasing, agreeable," from gratia "favor" (from suffixed form of PIE root *gwere- (2) "to favor"). Earlier was gratuital (1590s). Sense of "uncalled for, done without good reason" is first recorded 1690s.

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