Etymology
Advertisement
Spanish (adj.)

c. 1200, Spainisc, from Spaine "Spain," from Old French Espaigne (see Spaniard) + -ish. Replaced Old English Speonisc. Altered 16c. by influence of Latin. As a noun, "the Spanish language," from late 15c.

For Spanish Main see main. Spanish moss is attested from 1823. Spanish fly, the fabled aphrodisiac (ground-up cantharis blister-beetles), is attested from c. 1600. Spanish-American War was so called in British press speculations early 1898, even before it began in April. For Spanish Inquisition (by c. 1600), see inquisition.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Spanglish (n.)

"Spanish deformed by English words and idioms," by 1967, probably a nativization of Spanish Espanglish (1954); ultimately from Spanish (n.) + English.

Related entries & more 
fiesta (n.)

1844 as a Spanish word in English, "Spanish-American religious festival," Spanish, literally "feast" (see feast (n.)).

Related entries & more 
pistolero (n.)

1937, "gunman, gangster," in a Spanish or Spanish-American context, from Spanish, so called from the name of the weapon (compare pistolier).

Related entries & more 
senorita (n.)

in a Spanish context, "a young Spanish lady;" as a title, "Miss;" 1823, from Spanish señorita, Spanish title corresponding to English "Miss," diminutive of señora (see senora). The Portuguese equivalent is senhorita.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
barrio (n.)

1841, "ward of a Spanish or Spanish-speaking city," sometimes also used of rural settlements, from Spanish barrio "district, suburb," from Arabic barriya "open country" (fem.), from barr "outside" (of the city). The sense of "Spanish-speaking district in a U.S. city" (1939) originally is in reference to New York's Spanish Harlem.

Related entries & more 
tostada (n.)

1945, from Mexican Spanish, from past participle of Spanish tostar "to toast" (see toast (v.1)).

Related entries & more 
Jose 

masc. proper name, from Spanish José, Spanish form of Joseph.

Related entries & more 
chimenea (n.)

"free-standing fireplace," by 1987, from Mexican Spanish, literally "chimney," from Spanish, ultimately from Latin caminata (see chimney).

Related entries & more 
hombre (n.)

"a man" (especially one of Spanish descent), 1846, from Spanish, from Latin hominem, accusative of homo "man" (see homunculus).

Related entries & more