Etymology
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sort (n.)

late 14c., "group of people, animals, etc.; kind or variety of person or animal," from Old French sorte "class, kind," from Latin sortem (nominative sors) "lot; fate, destiny; share, portion; rank, category; sex, class, oracular response, prophecy," from PIE root *ser- (2) "to line up."

The sense evolution in Vulgar Latin is from "what is allotted to one by fate," to "fortune, condition," to "rank, class, order." Later (mid-15c.) "group, class, or category of items; kind or variety of thing; pattern, design." Out of sorts "not in usual good condition" is attested from 1620s, with literal sense of "out of stock."

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sort (v.)

mid-14c., "to arrange according to type or quality," from Old French sortir "allot, sort, assort," from Latin sortiri "draw lots, divide, choose," from sors (see sort (n.)). In some senses, the verb is a shortened form of assort.

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re-sort (v.)

"sort anew, sort afresh," 1889, from re- "again" + sort (v.). Spelled with a hyphen to distinguish it from resort (v.). Related: Re-sorted; re-sorting.

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all-sorts (n.)

name in old taverns and beer-shops for a beverage composed of remnants of other liquors mixed together, 1823, from the adjectival phrase; see all + plural of sort (n.).

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unsorted (adj.)

1530s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of sort (v.).

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sorcery (n.)

c. 1300, "witchcraft, magic, enchantment; act or instance of sorcery; supernatural state of affairs; seemingly magical works," from Old French sorcerie, from sorcier "sorcerer, wizard," from Medieval Latin sortiarius "teller of fortunes by lot; sorcerer," literally "one who influences fate or fortune," from Latin sors (genitive sortis) "lot, fate, fortune" (see sort (n.)).

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-rigged 

1769, of a vessel, "equipped with rigging" (of a specified sort), from rig (v.).

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matters (n.)

"events, affairs of a particular sort," 1560s, from plural of matter (n.).

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stardom (n.)

1860 in reference to celebrity, from star (n.) + -dom. From 1856 in reference to the celestial sort.

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mercer (n.)

"dealer in small wares or merchandise of any sort," also, specifically, "dealer in textiles or clothes of any sort, especially silk," c. 1200 (late 12c. as a surname), from Old French mercier "shopkeeper, tradesman," from Vulgar Latin *merciarius, from Latin merx "wares, merchandise" (see market (n.)). Related: Mercery.

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