Etymology
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sonata (n.)

1690s, from Italian sonata "piece of instrumental music," literally "sounded" (i.e. "played on an instrument," as opposed to cantata "sung"), fem. past participle of sonare "to sound," from Latin sonare "to sound" (from PIE root *swen- "to sound"). The meaning narrowed by mid-18c. toward large-scale works in three or four movements.

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sonant (adj.)

1846, from Latin sonantem (nominative sonans), present participle of sonare "make a noise, sound" (from PIE root *swen- "to sound"). As a noun from 1849.

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sound (v.1)

early 13c., sounen "to be audible, produce vibrations affecting the ear," from Old French soner (Modern French sonner) and directly from Latin sonare "to sound, make a noise" (from PIE root *swen- "to sound"). From late 14c. as "cause something (an instrument, etc.) to produce sound." Related: Sounded; sounding.

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sonorous (adj.)

1610s, from Latin sonorus "resounding," from sonor "sound, noise," from sonare "to sound, make a noise" (from PIE root *swen- "to sound"). Related: Sonorously; sonorousness. Earlier was sonouse (c. 1500), from Medieval Latin sonosus; sonourse "having a pleasing voice" (c. 1400), from sonor + -y (2).

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dissonance (n.)

early 15c., dissonaunce, "disagreement, discrepancy, incongruity, inconsistency" (between things), from Old French dissonance and directly from Medieval Latin dissonantia, from Latin dissonantem, present participle of dissonare "differ in sound," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + sonare "to sound, make a noise" (from PIE root *swen- "to sound"). The etymological sense, "inharmonious mixture or combination of sounds," is attested in English from 1590s.

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dissonant (adj.)

early 15c., dissonaunt, "at variance, disagreeing," from Old French dissonant (13c.) and directly from Latin dissonantem (nominative dissonans), present participle of dissonare "differ in sound," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + sonare "to sound, make a noise" (from PIE root *swen- "to sound"). The meaning "discordant in sound, harsh" is from 1570s. Related: Dissonantly.

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consonant (adj.)

early 15c., "agreeing, corresponding, harmonious," from Old French consonant (13c.) and directly from Latin consonantem (nominative consonans) "sounding together, agreeing," present participle of consonare "to sound together, sound aloud," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + sonare "to sound, make a noise" (from PIE root *swen- "to sound").

Of music, c. 1600; of words, 1640s. Related: Consonantly.

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consonant (n.)

early 14c., "alphabetic element other than a vowel," from Latin consonantem (nominative consonans) "sounding together, agreeing," as a noun, "a consonant" (consonantem littera), present participle of consonare "to sound together, sound aloud," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + sonare "to sound, make a noise" (from PIE root *swen- "to sound").

Consonants were thought of as sounds that are produced only together with vowels. Related: Consonantal.

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resound (v.)

late 14c., resownen, resounen, of a place, "re-echo, sound back, return an echo; reverberate with," from Anglo-French resuner, Old French resoner "reverberate" (12c., Modern French résonner), from Latin resonare "sound again, resound, echo" (source also of Spanish resonar, Italian risonare), from re- "back, again" (see re-) + sonare "to sound, make a noise" (from PIE root *swen- "to sound").

With unetymological -d- from mid-15c. (compare sound (n.1)). From 1520s of things. Related: Resounded; resounding.

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*swen- 

also swenə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to sound." 

It forms all or part of: assonance; consonant; dissonant; resound; sonant; sonata; sone; sonic; sonnet; sonogram; sonorous; sound (n.1) "noise, what is heard;" sound (v.1) "to be audible;" swan; unison.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit svanati "it sounds," svanah "sound, tone;" Latin sonus "sound, a noise," sonare "to sound;" Old Irish senim "the playing of an instrument;" Old English geswin "music, song," swinsian "to sing;" Old Norse svanr, Old English swan "swan," properly "the sounding bird."

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