Etymology
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smith (n.)

Old English smið "blacksmith, armorer, one who works in metal" (jewelers as well as blacksmiths), more broadly, "handicraftsman, practitioner of skilled manual arts" (also including carpenters), from Proto-Germanic *smithaz "skilled worker" (source also of Old Saxon smith, Old Norse smiðr, Danish smed, Old Frisian smith, Old High German smid, German Schmied, Gothic -smiþa, in aiza-smiþa "coppersmith"), from PIE root *smi- "to cut, work with a sharp instrument" (source also of Greek smile "knife, chisel").

Attested as a surname at least since c. 975. Other common surnames meaning "smith" in nearby languages include Ferraro (Italian), Haddad (Arabic), Kovács (Hungarian, a Slavic loan-word), Kowalski (Polish), Herrero (Spanish), Kuznets (Russian), MacGowan (Irish, "son of the blacksmith").

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smith (v.)
Old English smiðian "to forge, fabricate, design," from the source of smith (n.). Related: Smithed; smithing.
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tunesmith (n.)
1926, U.S. colloquial coinage, from tune (n.) + smith (n.).
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locksmith (n.)
"a maker of locks," early 13c., from lock (n.1) + smith (n.).
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silversmith (n.)
Old English seolfursmið; see silver (n.) + smith (n.).
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gunsmith (n.)
1580s, from gun (n.) + smith (n.). Middle English had gun-maker (late 14c.).
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coppersmith (n.)

also copper-smith, "artisan who works in copper," early 14c., c. 1300 as a surname," from copper (n.1) + smith.

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wordsmith (n.)
1896, from word (n.) + smith (n.). There is a "Mrs. F. Wordsmith" in the Detroit City Directory for 1855-56, but perhaps this is a typo.
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smithy (n.)
"workshop of a smith," c. 1300, from Old Norse smiðja (cognate with Old English smiððe), from Proto-Germanic *smith-ja-, from PIE smi- (see smith (n.)).
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