Etymology
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skill (n.)
late 12c., "power of discernment," from Old Norse skil "distinction, ability to make out, discernment, adjustment," related to skilja (v.) "to separate; discern, understand," from Proto-Germanic *skaljo- "divide, separate" (source also of Swedish skäl "reason," Danish skjel "a separation, boundary, limit," Middle Low German schillen "to differ," Middle Low German, Middle Dutch schele "separation, discrimination;" from PIE root *skel- (1) "to cut." Sense of "ability, cleverness" first recorded early 13c.
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skillful (adj.)
also skilful, early 14c., from skill + -ful. Related: Skillfully; skilfully.
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deskill (v.)

also de-skill, "alter a workplace so as no longer to require skilled workers" (usually through technology), 1941, from de- + skill. Related: Deskilled.

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skilled (adj.)
1550s, past-participle adjective from skill (v.) "to have personal and practical knowledge" (c. 1200), from Old Norse skilja "separate, part, divide; break off, break up; part company, take leave; discern, distinguish; understand, find out; decide, settle," from the source of skill (n.).
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*skel- (1)
also *kel-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to cut."

It forms all or part of: coulter; cutlass; half; halve; scale (n.1) "skin plates on fish or snakes;" scale (n.2) "weighing instrument;" scalene; scallop; scalp; scalpel; school (n.2) "group of fish;" sculpture; shale; sheldrake; shelf; shell; shield; shoal (n.2) "large number;" skoal; skill.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Latin culter "knife," scalpere "to cut, scrape;" Old Church Slavonic skolika "mussel, shell," Russian skala "rind, bark," Lithuanian skelti "split," Old English scell "shell," scalu "drinking cup, bowl, scale of a balance."
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horsemanship (n.)
"equestrian skill, management of horses," 1560s, from horseman + -ship.
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marksmanship (n.)

"character or skill of a marksman; dexterity in shooting at the mark," 1823, from marksman + -ship.

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fluky (adj.)
"depending on chance rather than skill," 1867, from fluke (n.2) + -y (2).
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workmanship (n.)
early 14c., "performance of labor," from workman + -ship. Meaning "skill as a workman" is from 1520s.
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