Advertisement
116 entries found.
Search filter: All Results 
sit (v.)
Old English sittan "to occupy a seat, be seated, sit down, seat oneself; remain, continue; settle, encamp, occupy; lie in wait; besiege" (class V strong verb; past tense sæt, past participle seten), from Proto-Germanic *setjan (source also of Old Saxon sittian, Old Norse sitja, Danish sidde, Old Frisian sitta, Middle Dutch sitten, Dutch zitten, Old High German sizzan, German sitzen, Gothic sitan), from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit."

With past tense sat, formerly also set, now restricted to dialect, and sate, now archaic; and past participle sat, formerly sitten. In reference to a legislative assembly, from 1510s. Meaning "to baby-sit" is recorded from 1966.

To sit back "be inactive" is from 1943. To sit on one's hands was originally "to withhold applause" (1926); later, "to do nothing" (1959). To sit around "be idle, do nothing" is 1915, American English. To sit out "not take part" is from 1650s. Sitting pretty is from 1916.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
sit-up (n.)
also situp, kind of physical exercise, 1955, from the verbal phrase (attested from early 13c.); see sit (v.) + up (adv.). Related: Sit-ups.
Related entries & more 
sit-down (adj.)
1836 of meals, 1936 of strikes, from verbal phrase (c. 1200), from sit (v.) + down (adv.); as a noun, sit-down "act of sitting down" is from 1861.
Related entries & more 
sit-in 
1936, in reference to session musicians; 1937, in reference to union action; 1941, in reference to student protests. From the verbal phrase; see sit (v.) + in (adv.). To sit in is attested from 1868 in the sense "attend, be present;" from 1919 specifically as "attend as an observer."
Related entries & more 
sitter (n.)
c. 1300, "one that sits," agent noun from sit (v.). As short for baby-sitter from 1937.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
babysit (v.)
also baby-sit, 1947, from baby (n.) + sit (v.); figurative use (often contemptuous) by 1968. Babysitting is from 1946.
Related entries & more 
sitz-bath (n.)
1849, a hybrid, from German Sitzbad, literally "bath in a sitting position," from German sitzen (see sit (v.)) with English bath for German Bad.
Related entries & more 
sitzkrieg (n.)
1940, "static warfare" (such as prevailed in Europe in the winter of 1939-40), R.A.F. coinage on analogy of blitzkrieg (q.v.), from German sitz "a sitting," from sitzen "to sit" (see sit (v.)).
Related entries & more 
babysitter (n.)

also baby-sitter, "person who looks after a child or children while the parents are away," 1914, from baby (n.) + agent noun from sit (v.). Short form sitter is attested from 1937.

Related entries & more 
sitting (n.)
early 13c., verbal noun from sit (v.). Meaning "a meeting of a body" is from c. 1400. Meaning "interval during which one sits" (for some purpose, especially to have one's portrait taken) is from 1706. Sitting-room first recorded 1771. Slang sitting duck "easy target" first recorded 1944; literal sense is from 1867 (it is considered not sporting to shoot at one).
Related entries & more