Etymology
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simulation (n.)
Origin and meaning of simulation
mid-14c., "a false show, false profession," from Old French simulation "pretence" and directly from Latin simulationem (nominative simulatio) "an imitating, feigning, false show, hypocrisy," noun of action from past participle stem of simulare "imitate," from stem of similis "like, resembling, of the same kind" (see similar). Meaning "a model or mock-up for purposes of experiment or training" is from 1954.
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simulated (adj.)
1620s, "feigned," past-participle adjective from simulate (v.). Meaning "imitative for purposes of experiment or training" is from 1966 (agent noun simulator in the related sense dates from 1947; also see simulation). In commercial jargon, "artificial, imitation" by 1942.
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simulate (v.)
1620s, "feign, pretend, assume falsely" (implied in simulated), back-formation from simulation or else from Latin simulatus, past participle of simulare "to make like, imitate, copy, represent," from stem of similis "like, resembling, of the same kind" (see similar). Meaning "to use a model to imitate certain conditions for purposes of study or training" is from 1947. Related: Simulating.
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*sem- (1)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "one; as one, together with."

It forms all or part of: anomalous; anomaly; assemble; assimilate; ensemble; facsimile; fulsome; hamadryad; haplo-; haploid; hendeca-; hendiadys; henotheism; hetero-; heterodox; heterosexual; homeo-; homeopathy; homeostasis; homily; homo- (1) "same, the same, equal, like;" homogenous; homoiousian; homologous; homonym; homophone; homosexual; hyphen; resemble; same; samizdat; samovar; samsara; sangha; Sanskrit; seem; seemly; semper-; sempiternal; similar; simple; simplex; simplicity; simulacrum; simulate; simulation; simultaneous; single; singlet; singular; some; -some (1); -some (2); verisimilitude.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit sam "together," samah "even, level, similar, identical;" Avestan hama "similar, the same;" Greek hama "together with, at the same time," homos "one and the same," homios "like, resembling," homalos "even;" Latin similis "like;" Old Irish samail "likeness;" Old Church Slavonic samu "himself."

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mimicry (n.)

"an act of imitation in speech, manner, or appearance," 1680s; see mimic (adj.) + -ry. The zoological sense of "the external simulation of something else in form, color, etc." is from 1861.

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mock-up (n.)

also mockup, "model, simulation" 1919, perhaps World War I, from the verbal phrase mock up "make an experimental model" (1911), from mock (v.) + up (adv.).

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ape (v.)
"to imitate," 1630s, but the notion is implied earlier, as in the phrase play the ape (1570s), and Middle English apeshipe "ape-like behavior, simulation" (mid-15c.); and the noun sense of "one who mimics" may date from early 13c. Related: Aped; aping.
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periwig (n.)

"peruke, artificial imitation of a head of hair," worn as a fashionable accessory or as part of a professional costume, 1520s, perwyke, a popular corruption of perruck, from French perruque (see peruke), evidently by simulation of the French pronunciation and the influence of peri-.

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