Etymology
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signification (n.)

early 14c., "symbolization, representation," from Old French significacion and directly from Latin significationem (nominative significatio) "a signifying, indication, expression, sign, token, meaning, emphasis," noun of action from past participle stem of significare "make known, indicate" (see signify). From late 14c. as "meaning" (of a word, etc.). Old English used getacnung as a loan-translation of Latin significatio.

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bob (n.3)
slang word for "shilling," 1789, but the signification is unknown.
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unmeaning (adj.)
"having no signification," 1709, from un- (1) "not" + present participle of mean (v.).
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blotto (adj.)
"drunk," c. 1905, from some signification of blot (v.) in its "soak up liquid" meaning.
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ninnyhammer (n.)
also ninny-hammer, "simpleton," 1590s, from ninny + hammer (n.), but the signification of the second element is obscure.
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jolt-head (n.)
"a stupid head," 1530s; later also "a big, clumsy, stupid person." The origin and signification of jolt here is unknown.
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cockhorse (n.)

child's name for a horse, also a toy horse or rocking horse, 1540s, a nursery word of uncertain signification.

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rhino (n.)

short for rhinoceros, 1884. As slang for "cash" (also rino) 1680s, but the signification is now unknown. Hence cant rhinocerial "rich."

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dippy (adj.)

"mad, insane, crazy," especially in love, 1903, perhaps from dip + -y (2), but the exact signification is unclear. Another theory connects it with dipsomania.

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petcock (n.)

also pet-cock, "a small plug-cock, made to be fastened to a pipe and used for draining water and condensation from steam cylinders, etc.," 1864, from cock (n.2); the signification of the first element is uncertain.

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