Etymology
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amphi- 
before a vowel amph-, word-forming element meaning "on both sides, of both kinds; on all sides, all around," from Greek amphi (prep., adv.) "round about, on both sides of, all around; about, regarding," which is cognate with Latin ambi-, both from PIE root *ambhi- "around."
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ambidextrous (adj.)

also ambidexterous, "able to use both hands equally," 1640s, with -ous + Medieval Latin ambidexter, literally "right-handed on both sides," from ambi- "both, on both sides" (see ambi-) + dexter "right-handed" (from PIE root *deks- "right; south"). An earlier English use of ambidexter (adj.) meant "double-dealer, one who takes both sides in a conflict" (late 14c.).

Its opposite, ambilevous "left-handed on both sides," hence "clumsy" (1640s) is rare. Ambidexter as a noun is attested from 1530s (in the sense "one who takes bribes from both sides") and is the earliest form of the word in English; its sense of "one who uses both hands equally well" appears by 1590s.

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siding (n.)
c. 1600, "a taking of sides in a conflict or debate," verbal noun from side. First attested 1825 in the railroad sense; 1829, American English, in the architectural sense of "boarding on the sides of a building."
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ambidexterity (n.)

1650s, with -ity + Medieval Latin ambidexter, literally "right-handed on both sides," from ambi- "both, on both sides" (see ambi-) + dexter "right-handed" (from PIE root *deks- "right; south").

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many-sided (adj.)

"having many sides," 1650s; see many + side (n.).

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ambi- 
word-forming element meaning "both, on both sides," from Latin ambi- "around, round about" (before vowels amb-, also sometimes reduced to am-, an-), from PIE root *ambhi- "around," which is probably an ablative plural (*ant-bhi "from both sides") of *ant- "front, forehead."
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side (v.)
late 15c., "to cut into sides" (of meat), from side (n.). Meaning "to support one of the parties in a discussion, dispute, etc.," is first attested 1590s, from side (n.) in the figurative sense; earlier to hold sides (late 15c.). Related: Sided; siding.
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scalene (adj.)

"having unequal sides," in mathematics, 1680s, from Late Latin scalenus, from Greek skalenōs "uneven, unequal, odd (numbered)," as a noun, "triangle with unequal sides" (trigōnon skalēnon), from skallein "to chop, hoe, dig, stir up" (compare its derivative, skalops "a mole"), from PIE root *skel- (1) "to cut."

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bilateral (adj.)
"having two sides," 1775; see bi- "two" + lateral (adj.). Related: Bilaterally.
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chops (n.)
"jaws, sides of the face," c. 1500, perhaps a variant of chaps (n.2) in the same sense, which is of unknown origin.
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