Etymology
Advertisement
sic (adv.)

insertion in printed quotation to call attention to error in the original; Latin, literally "so, thus, in this way," related to or emphatic of si "if," from PIE root *so- "this, that" (source also of Old English sio "she"). Used regularly in English articles from 1876, perhaps by influence of similar use in French (1872).

[I]t amounts to Yes, he did say that, or Yes, I do mean that, in spite of your natural doubts. It should be used only when doubt is natural; but reviewers & controversialists are tempted to pretend that it is, because (sic) provides them with a neat & compendious form of sneer. [Fowler]

Sic passim is "generally so throughout."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
sic (v.)
"to set upon, attack;" see sick (v.).
Related entries & more 
si 
"yes" in Italian and Spanish; from Latin sic "so" (see sic).
Related entries & more 
sic transit gloria mundi 
c. 1600, Latin, literally "thus passes the glory of the world;" perhaps an alteration of a passage in Thomas à Kempis's "Imitatio Christi" (1471).
Related entries & more 
sike (n.)
also syke, "small stream," a Scottish and Northern word, from Old English sic or cognate Old Norse sik "a ditch, trench."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
-aholic 
word-forming element abstracted from alcoholic; first in sugarholic (1965), foodoholic (sic, 1965); later in workaholic (1968), golfaholic (1971), chocoholic (1971), and shopaholic (1984).
Related entries & more 
Pavlovian (adj.)

1931, from the theories, experiments, and methods of Russian physiologist Ivan Petrovich Pavlov (1849-1936), especially in connection with the conditioned salivary reflexes of dogs in response to the mental stimulus of the sound of a bell (attested from 1911, in Pavloff [sic] method).

Related entries & more 
no-smoking (adj.)

"in which smoking is not permitted," 1905; the sign wording itself is attested by 1817.

Smoking is a vice to [sic] — and a national one, of such magnitude that railroad corporations throughout all their routes in the United States, have a special command in large letters, conspicuously placed at depots and inside of the cars — "No smoking allowed here." ["The Sailor's Magazine," December 1840]
Related entries & more 
onset (n.)

1530s, "attack, assault, a rushing or setting upon," from on + set (n.); compare verbal phrase to set (something) on (someone), c. 1300, originally "sic (a dog) on." Weaker sense of "beginning, start" is recorded from 1560s. Figurative use in reference to a calamity, disease, etc. is from 1580s. Middle English had set (n.3) "attack, onslaught" (mid-14c.).

Related entries & more 
hoi polloi (n.)
1837, from Greek hoi polloi (plural) "the people," literally "the many" (plural of polys, from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill"). Used in Greek by Dryden (1668) and Byron (1822), in both cases preceded by the, even though Greek hoi means "the," a mistake repeated often by subsequent writers who at least have the excuse of ignorance of Greek. Ho "the" is from PIE *so- "this, that" (nominative), cognate with English the and Latin sic. From the adjective agoraios "pertaining to the agora; frequenting the market" Greek had hoi agoraioi "loungers in the market, loafers, common, low men."
Related entries & more