Etymology
Advertisement
shout (v.)

c. 1300, shouten, schowten "to call or cry out loudly," a word of unknown origin; perhaps from the root of shoot (v.) on the notion of "throw the voice out loudly," or related to Old Norse skuta "a taunt" (compare scout (v.2)); both of which are reconstructed to be from PIE root *skeud- "to shoot, chase, throw."

The transitive sense of "utter in a loud and vehement voice" is by late 14c. Related: Shouted; shouting. To be all over but (the) shouting when the outcome appears certain is by 1834.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
shout (n.)

"a loud call, a vehement and sudden cry," also sometimes "clamor, uproar;" mid-14c., from shout (v.).

Related entries & more 
scout (v.2)

"to reject (something) with scorn," 1710, earlier "to mock, ridicule, treat with disdain and contempt" (c. 1600, now obsolete), of Scandinavian origin (compare Old Norse skuta, skute "to taunt"), from skotja "to shoot" (on the notion of a "shooting of words"), which according to Watkins is from a Proto-Germanic *skut- from PIE root *skeud- "to shoot, chase, throw." also source of shout (v.). Compare Middle English scoute (n.) "a wretch, rascal, rogue" (male or female), attested from late 14c. Related: Scouted; scouting; scoutingly.

Related entries & more 
*skeud- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to shoot, chase, throw."

It forms all or part of: scot-free; scout (v.2) "to reject with scorn;" sheet (n.1) "cloth, covering;" sheet (n.2) "rope that controls a sail;" shoot; shot; shout; shut; shuttle; skeet; wainscot.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit skundate "hastens, makes haste;" Old Church Slavonic iskydati "to throw out;" Lithuanian skudrus "quick, nimble;" Old English sceotan "to hurl missiles," Old Norse skjota "to shoot with (a weapon)."

Related entries & more 
kos (n.)

measure of distance in India (about 2 miles), from Hindi kos, from Sanskrit krosah, literally "a call, a shout;" thus, "distance within which a man's shout can be heard."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
clamor (n.)

late 14c., "a great outcry," also figurative, "loud or urgent demand," from Old French clamor "call, cry, appeal, outcry" (12c., Modern French clameur), from Latin clamor "a shout, a loud call" (either friendly or hostile), from clamare "to cry out" (from PIE root *kele- (2) "to shout").

Related entries & more 
jubilate (v.)

"make a joyful noise," 1640s, from Latin iubilatus, past participle of iubilare "shout for joy" (see jubilant). Related: Jubilated; jubilating.

Related entries & more 
acclaim (n.)

"act of acclaiming, a shout of joy," 1667 (in Milton), from acclaim (v.).

Related entries & more 
declamatory (adj.)

"of or characteristic of a declamation," 1580s, from Latin declamatorius "pertaining to the practice of speaking," from declamatus, past participle of declamare "to practice public speaking, to bluster," from de-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see de-) + clamare "to cry, shout" (from PIE root *kele- (2) "to shout").

Related entries & more 
acclamation (n.)

1540s, "act of shouting or applauding in approval," from Latin acclamationem (nominative acclamatio) "a calling, exclamation, shout of approval," noun of action from past-participle stem of acclamare "to call to, cry out at, shout approval or disapproval of," from assimilated form of ad "to, toward" (see ad-) + clamare "cry out" (from PIE root *kele- (2) "to shout"). As a method of spontaneous approval of resolutions, etc., by unanimous voice vote, by 1801, probably from the French Revolution.

Related entries & more