Etymology
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shortening (n.)
1540s, "action of making short," verbal noun from shorten. Meaning "butter or other fat used in baking" (1796) is from shorten in the sense "make crumbly" (1733), from short (adj.) in the secondary sense of "easily crumbled" (early 15c.), which perhaps arose via the notion of "having short fibers." This is the short in shortbread and shortcake.
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shortbread (n.)
also short-bread, 1755, from short (see shortening) + bread (n.).
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shortcake (n.)
also short-cake, 1590s, from short (see shortening) + cake (n.).
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stereo 
1823 as a shortening of stereotype (n.); 1876 as a shortening of stereoscope; 1954 as a shortening of stereophonic (adj.); the noun meaning "stereophonic record or tape player" is recorded from 1964.
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kilo (n.)
1870, shortening of kilogram. Slang shortening key (in drug trafficking) is attested from 1968.
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vac 
1709 as a colloquial shortening of vacation (n.); 1942 as a colloquial shortening of vacuum (v.); 1974 as a colloquial shortening of vacuum cleaner.
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psycho (adj.)
1927, shortening of psychological; 1936 (Raymond Chandler) as shortening of psychopathic (adj.).
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wayward (adj.)
late 14c., shortening of aweiward "turned away," from way (adv.), shortening of away + -ward. Related: Waywardly; waywardness.
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med (n.)

by 1851 as a shortening of medic. As a colloquial shortening of medicine, by 1942. With a capital M and short for Mediterranean, by 1948. Meds as a shortening of medications is attested in hospital jargon by 1965.

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