Etymology
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short circuit (n.)

also short-circuit, 1854, in electricity, "a shunt connecting two parts of an electric current so as to carry a greater part of it," from short (adj.) + circuit (n.). As a verb, "introduce a shunt of low resistance into an electric current," from 1867; intransitive sense from 1902; in the figurative sense by 1899. Related: Short-circuited; short-circuiting.

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back off (v.)

"retreat, stop annoying someone," by 1938, from the verbal phrase, from back (v.) + off (adv.).

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civil union (n.)

by 2000, the usual U.S. term for legally recognized same-sex unions short of marriage.

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shut up (v.)

c. 1400, "keep from view or use, render inaccessible" early 15c., "to lock up, confine," from shut (v.) + up (adv.). The meaning "cause to stop talking" is from 1814 (Jane Austen). The intransitive meaning "cease from speaking" is from 1840, also as a command to be silent, sometimes colloquialized in print as shuddup (1940). Put up or shut up "defend yourself or be silent" is U.S. slang, by 1868.

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hot pants (n.)

"short-shorts," 1970, from hot (adj.) + pants (n.). Probably influenced by earlier sense of "sexual arousal" (1927).

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thank you 

polite formula used in acknowledging a favor, c. 1400, short for I thank you (see thank). As a noun, from 1792.

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pied a terre (n.)

"small town house or rooms used for short residences," 1829, French, pied à terre, literally "foot on the ground."

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g spot (n.)

also g-spot, 1981, short for Gräfenberg spot, named for German gynecologist Ernst Gräfenberg (1881-1957), who described it in 1950.

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pro bono 

short for Medieval Latin pro bono publico "for the public good;" from pro (prep.) "on behalf of, for" (see pro-) + ablative of bonum "good" (see bene-).

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