Etymology
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lighting (n.)
"shining, illumination," Old English lihting "shining, illumination; dawn; lightning," from leoht (see light (n.)).
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radiant (adj.)

mid-15c., "shining, bright, shooting or emitting diverging rays of light," later also of heat, from Latin radiantem (nominative radians) "beaming, shining," present participle of radiare "to beam, shine" (see radiation). Of beauty, wit, etc., "sparkling, beaming," attested from c. 1500. Related: Radiantly.

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glossy (adj.)
"smooth and shining," 1550s, from gloss (n.1) + -y (2). Figurative use from 1690s. The noun sense of "photograph with a glossy surface" is from 1931. Related: Glossies; glossiness.
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gladly (adv.)
Old English glædlice "joyfully, kindly, willingly" (also "bright, shining; pleasant, agreeable"); see glad (adj.) + -ly (2).
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blank (adj.)

early 13c., "white, pale, colorless," from Old French blanc "white, shining," from Frankish *blank "white, gleaming," or some other Germanic source (compare Old Norse blakkr, Old English blanca "white horse;" Old High German blanc, blanch; German blank "shining, bright"), from Proto-Germanic *blangkaz "to shine, dazzle," extended form of PIE root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn," also "shining white."

Meaning "having empty spaces" evolved c. 1400. Sense of "void of expression" (a blank look) is from 1550s. Spanish blanco, Italian bianco are said to be from Germanic. Related: Blankly, blankness.

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phosphorescent (adj.)

shining with a faint light or luminosity like that of phosphorus, luminous without sensible heat," "1766, from Modern Latin phosphorus (see phosphorus) + -escent. Related: Phosphorescently.

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Roxanne 

fem. proper name, from French, from Latin Roxane, from Greek Rhoxane, of Persian origin (compare Avestan raoxšna- "shining, bright"). The English spelling was influenced by Anne.

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lambency (n.)
"quality of shining with a clear, soft light," 1817, from lambent (q.v.) + abstract noun suffix -cy. A figurative use, the etymological Latin sense "act or quality of licking" has been rare in English.
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eclampsia (n.)
1866, from Modern Latin, from Greek eklampsis "a shining forth, exceeding brightness," from ek- "out" (see ex-) + stem of lampein "to shine" (see lamp) + abstract noun ending -ia.
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Phoebus 

epithet of Apollo as sun-god, late 14c., phebus, febus, from Latin Phoebus, from Greek Phoibos, literally "bright, shining, radiant," a word of unknown origin. Related: Phoeban, Phoebean.

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