Etymology
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shingles (n.)
"inflammatory disease of the skin," late 14c., from Medieval Latin cingulus (loan-translation of Greek zoster "girdle"), variant of Latin cingulum "girdle," from cingere "to gird" (see cinch (n.)). The inflammation often extends around the middle of the body, like a girdle.
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shingle (v.)
"cover with shingles" (of houses), 1560s, from shingle (n.). Related: Shingled; shingling.
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herpes (n.)
late 14c., "any inflammatory, spreading skin condition" (used of shingles, gangrene, etc.), from Latin herpes "a spreading skin eruption," from Greek herpes, the name for the disease shingles, literally "creeping," from herpein "to creep, move slowly" (cognate with Latin serpere "to creep;" see serpent). The condition was not distinguished into specific diseases until early 19c.
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zoster (n.)

kind of seaweed, c. 1600, Latin, from Greek zōstēr "girdle," originally "warrior's belt," from zōnnynai (see zone (n.)). Meaning "shingles" is from 1706; in the literal sense, "a belt or girdle, especially for men," from 1824.

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imbricate (v.)
"to lay one over another" (as shingles, etc.), 1704 (implied in imbricated), from Latin imbricatus "covered with tiles," past participle of imbricare "to cover with rain tiles" (see imbrication). As an adjective from 1650s. Related: Imbricated; imbricating.
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pimple (n.)

"small, often inflamed, swelling of the skin," late 14c. (early 14c. as a surname), of unknown origin; perhaps related to Old English pipligende "having shingles;" also compare Latin papula, papilla (see pap (n.2)). As a verb, "to cover with pimples," from c. 1600. Related: Pimples.

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shingle (n.1)
"thin piece of wood," c. 1200, scincle, from Late Latin scindula (also the source of German Schindel), altered (by influence of Greek schidax "lath" or schindalmos "splinter") from Latin scandula "roof tile," from scindere "to cut, rend, tear asunder, split; split up, part, divide, separate," from PIE *skind-, from root *skei- "to cut, split." Meaning "small signboard" is first attested 1842. Sense of "woman's short haircut" is from 1924; the verb meaning "to cut the hair so as to give the impression of overlapping shingles" is from 1857.
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