Etymology
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shine (v.)

Old English scinan "shed light, be radiant, be resplendent, illuminate," of persons, "be conspicuous" (class I strong verb; past tense scan, past participle scinen), from Proto-Germanic *skeinanan (source also of Old Saxon and Old High German skinan, Old Norse and Old Frisian skina, Dutch schijnen, German scheinen, Gothic skeinan "to shine, appear"), which perhaps is from a PIE root *skai- "to shine, to gleam" (source also of Old Church Slavonic sinati "to flash up, shine"). Transitive meaning "to black (boots)" is from 1610s. Related: Shined (in the shoe polish sense), otherwise shone; shining.

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shine (n.)
1520s, "brightness," from shine (v.). Meaning "polish given to a pair of boots" is from 1871. Derogatory meaning "black person" is from 1908 (perhaps from glossiness of skin or, on another guess, from frequent employment as shoeshines). Phrase to take a shine to "fancy" is American English slang from 1839, perhaps from shine up to "attempt to please as a suitor." Shiner is from late 14c. as "something that shines;" sense of "black eye" first recorded 1903, American English, in East Side immigrant dialect.
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shoe-shine (adj.)
1911, from shoe (n.) + shine (n.). One who shines shoes for money was a shoeblacker (1755).
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Shinola (n.)
brand of shoe polish, by 1904, from shine + -ola.
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shiny (adj.)
1580s, from shine (n.) + -y (2). As a noun meaning "a shiny object" (also "money") from 1856. Related: Shininess.
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scintilla (n.)

1690s, "a spark, a glimmer," hence "least particle, trace," from figurative use of Latin scintilla "particle of fire, spark, glittering speck, atom," which traditionally is traced to PIE root *skai- "to shine, to gleam" (source also of Gothic skeinan, Old English scinan "to shine;" see shine (v.)), but there are phonetic objections.

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shimmer (v.)
Old English scimerian "to glitter, shimmer, glisten, shine," related to (perhaps a frequentative of) scimian "to shine," from Proto-Germanic *skim- (source also of Swedish skimra, Dutch schemeren "to glitter," German schimmern), from PIE root *skai- "to gleam, to shine" (see shine (v.). Related: Shimmered; shimmering.
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outshine (v.)

1590s, "shine more brightly than" (trans.), from out- + shine (v.). In this sense perhaps coined by Spenser. It was used in Middle English in an intransitive sense of "resplendent, shining forth" (late 14c.). Figurative sense of "to surpass in splendor or excellence" is from 1610s. Related: Outshone; outshining.

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cheetah (n.)

"large, spotted cat of India," 1704, from Hindi chita "leopard," from Sanskrit chitraka "hunting leopard, tiger," literally "speckled," from chitra-s "distinctively marked, variegated, many-colored, bright, clear" (from PIE *kit-ro-, from root *skai- "to shine, gleam, be bright;" see shine (v.)) + kayah "body," from PIE *kwei- "to build, make" (see poet).

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