Etymology
Advertisement
shin (n.)
Old English scinu "shin, fore part of the lower leg," from Proto-Germanic *skino "thin piece" (source also of Dutch scheen, Old High German scina, German Schienbein "shin, shinbones"), from PIE root *skei- "to cut, split." Shin splints is attested from 1930.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
shin (v.)
"to climb by using arms and legs" (originally a nautical word), 1829, from shin (n.). Related: Shinned; shinning.
Related entries & more 
shinny (v.)
"to climb a rope, pole, etc.," 1888, from use of shins and ankles to do so; see shin (n.). Earlier simply shin (1829). Related: Shinnied; shinnying.
Related entries & more 
shinplaster (n.)

also shin-plaster, piece of paper soaked in vinegar and used to treat sore legs, from shin (n.) + plaster (n.). In U.S. history, a jocular phrase or term of abuse for "devalued low-denomination paper currency" (1824).

Related entries & more 
chine (n.)

"spine, backbone," c. 1300, from Anglo-French achine, Old French eschine (11c., Modern French échine), a word of uncertain origin, perhaps from Germanic (compare Old English scinu "shinbone;" see shin).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Shinto (n.)
native religious system of Japan, 1727, from Chinese shin tao "way of the gods," from shin "god, gods, spirit" + tao "way, path, doctrine." Related: Shintoism.
Related entries & more 
shinny (n.)
also shinney, primitive form of hockey, 1670s, perhaps from Gaelic sinteag "a bound, a leap." OED suggests origin from shin ye "the cry used in the game."
Related entries & more 
greave (n.)
"metal armor to protect the front of the leg below the knee," c. 1300, from Old French greve "shin, armor for the leg" (12c.), of unknown origin. [Klein suggests it ultimately is from Egyptian Arabic gaurab "stocking, apparel for the leg."]
Related entries & more 
intercrural (adj.)
"between the thighs," or in medicine, "between leg-like structures," 1690s, from inter- "between" + Latin crus "shin, shank, (lower) leg; supports of a bridge," from Proto-Italic *krus-, which is of uncertain origin.
Related entries & more 
gastrocnemius (n.)
1670s, from Latinized form of Greek gastroknemia "calf of the leg," from gaster "belly" (see gastric) + kneme "calf of the leg," from PIE *kone-mo- "shin, leg-bone" (see ham (n.1)). So called for its form (the "protuberant" part of the calf of the leg). Related: Gastrocnemical.
Related entries & more