Etymology
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shatter (v.)
early 14c., transitive, probably a variant of Middle English scateren (see scatter (v.)). Compare Old Dutch schetteren Low German schateren. Formations such as scatter-brained had parallel forms in shatter-brained, etc. Intransitive sense from 1560s. Related: Shattered; shattering. Carlyle (1841) used shatterment. Shatters "fragments" is from 1630s.
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shattering (adj.)
1560s, present-participle adjective from shatter (v.). Related: Shatteringly.
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scatter (v.)
mid-12c. (transitive), possibly a northern English variant of Middle English schateren (see shatter), reflecting Norse influence. Intransitive sense from early 15c. Related: Scattered; scattering. As a noun from 1640s.
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squash (v.)
"to crush, squeeze," early 14c., squachen, from Old French esquasser, escasser "to crush, shatter, destroy, break," from Vulgar Latin *exquassare, from Latin ex "out" (see ex-) + quassare "to shatter" (see quash "to crush"). Related: Squashed; squashing.
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splinter (v.)
1580s (transitive), from splinter (n.). Figurative sense from c. 1600. Intransitive use from 1620s. Middle English had splinder (v.) "to shatter" (of a spear, etc.), mid-15c. Related: Splintered; splintering.
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Erechtheus 
legendary first king and founder of Athens, from Latin Erechtheus, from Greek Erekhtheos, literally "render, shaker" (of the earth), from erekhthein "to rend, break, shatter, shake." Hence Erechtheum, the name of a temple on the Athenian acropolis.
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quassation (n.)

"act of shaking, concussion," early 15c., quassacioun, from Latin quassationem (nominative quassatio) "a shaking or beating," noun of action from past-participle stem of quassare "to shatter, shake or toss violently" (see quash). 

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cask (n.)

"water-tight, barrel-like vessel for containing liquids," mid-15c., from French casque "a cask; a helmet," from Spanish casco "skull; wine-vat; helmet," originally "potsherd," from cascar "to break up," from Vulgar Latin *quassicare, frequentative of Latin quassare "to shake, shatter" (see quash). The sense evolution is uncertain.

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craze (v.)

late 14c., crasen, craisen "to shatter, crush, break to pieces," probably a Germanic word and perhaps ultimately from a Scandinavian source (such as Old Norse *krasa"shatter"), but it seems to have entered English via Old French crasir (compare Modern French écraser). Original sense preserved in crazy quilt (1886) pattern and in reference to cracking in pottery glazing (1815).

Mental sense of "derange the intellect of, make insane" (late 15c.)  perhaps comes via the transferred sense of "be diseased or deformed" (mid-15c.), or it might be an image of cracked or broken things. The intransitive sense of "become insane" is by 1818.  Related: Crazed; crazing.

... there is little assurance in reconciled enemies: whose affections (for the most part) are like unto Glasse; which being once cracked, can neuer be made otherwise then crazed and vnsound. [John Hayward, "The Life and Raigne of King Henrie the IIII," 1599]
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eclat (n.)
1670s, "showy brilliance," from French éclat "splinter, fragment" (12c.), also "flash of brilliance," from eclater "burst out; shine brilliantly; splinter, fly to fragments," from Old French esclater "smash, shatter into pieces," which is of uncertain origin, perhaps from a Germanic word related to slit (v.) and to Old High German skleizen "tear to pieces; to split, cleave." Extended sense of "conspicuous success" is first recorded in English in 1741.
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