Etymology
Advertisement
shallow (adj.)

c. 1400, schalowe, shaloue, "not deep" (of water, a river, etc.); also of the human body, "thin, emaciated," probably from the same source as Old English sceald "shallow" (see shoal (n.)), perhaps as an abbreviated form of *scealdig. Of breathing, attested from 1875; of thought or feeling, "superficial," by 1580s. Related: Shallowly; shallowness. The noun, usually shallows, "place where water is not deep" is recorded from 1570s, from the adjective.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
wherry (n.)
"light, shallow rowboat," mid-15c., of unknown origin.
Related entries & more 
shoal (n.1)
"place of shallow water," c. 1300, from Old English schealde (adj.), from sceald "shallow," from Proto-Germanic *skala- (source also of Swedish skäll "thin;" Low German schol, Frisian skol "not deep"), of uncertain origin. The terminal -d was dropped 16c.
Related entries & more 
fovea (n.)
"depression or shallow pit in a surface," 1849, Latin, literally "small pit," related to favissae "underground reservoirs;" which is of unknown origin, perhaps from Etruscan. Related: Foveal; foveated.
Related entries & more 
punnet (n.)

"small, round, broad, shallow basket," for displaying fruits or flowers, 1822, chiefly British, of obscure origin.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
purl (v.2)

"flow with a murmuring sound," as a shallow stream over stones, 1580s, imitative, perhaps from a Scandinavian language (compare Swedish porla). Related: Purled; purling.

Related entries & more 
brief (adj.)
c. 1300, bref, "of short duration;" early 14c., "small with respect to length, short;" from Latin brevis (adj.) "short, low, little, shallow," from PIE *mregh-wi-, from root *mregh-u- "short."
Related entries & more 
*mregh-u- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "short."

It forms all or part of: abbreviate; abbreviation; abridge; amphibrach; brace; bracelet; brachio-; brachiopod; brachiosaurus; brachy-; brassiere; breviary; brevity; brief; brumal; brume; embrace; merry; mirth; pretzel; vambrace.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek brakhys "short;" Latin brevis "short, low, little, shallow;" Old Church Slavonic bruzeja "shallow places, shoals;" Gothic gamaurgjan "to shorten."
Related entries & more 
kylix (n.)

"elegant cup or vase for drinking" (usually broad and shallow, with handles), 1873 (earlier in German), from Greek kylix "cup," which is similar to Latin calix "deep bowl, cup" (see chalice).

Related entries & more 
griddle (n.)
shallow frying pan, early 13c., apparently from Anglo-French gridil, Old North French gredil, altered from Old French graille "grill, grating," from Latin craticula "small griddle" (see grill (n.)). Griddle-cake is from 1783.
Related entries & more