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Shakespeare 

surname recorded from 1248; it means "a spearman." This was a common type of English surname (Shakelance (1275), Shakeshaft (1332)). Shake (v.) in the sense of "to brandish or flourish (a weapon)" is attested from late Old English

Heo scæken on heore honden speren swiðe stronge.
[Laymon, "Brut," c. 1205]

Compare also shake-buckler "a swaggerer, a bully;" shake-rag "ragged fellow, tatterdemalion." "Never a name in English nomenclature so simple or so certain in origin. It is exactly what it looks -- Shakespear" [Bardsley, "Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames," 1901]. Nevertheless, speculation flourishes. The name was variously written in contemporary records, also Shakespear, Shakespere, the last form being the one adopted by the New Shakespere Society of London and the first edition of the OED. Related: Shakespearian (1753); Shakesperean (1796); Shakesperian (1755).

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ruttish (adj.)

"lustful, lascivious, libidinous," c. 1600 (Shakespeare); see rut (n.2) + -ish.

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reverb (n.)

1961, colloquial shortening of reverberation. Shakespeare uses it as a verb (Lear).

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factional (adj.)
1640s, from faction (n.1) + -al (1). Shakespeare used factionary (c. 1600).
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nuptials (n.)

"marriage, wedding," 1550s, plural of nuptial. Now always plural, but Shakespeare uses the singular.

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footfall (n.)
c. 1600, "the tread of the foot;" see foot (n.) + fall (n.). Perhaps first in Shakespeare.
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content (n.1)

"state of mind which results from satisfaction with present circumstances," 1570s, from content (adj.). Phrase heart's content is from 1590s (Shakespeare).

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raw-boned (adj.)

"having little flesh on the bones, gaunt," 1590s (Shakespeare), from raw (adj.) + bone (n.).

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spilth (n.)
"that which is spilled," c. 1600, from spill (v.) + -th (2). Used, once, by Shakespeare.
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bardolatry (n.)
"worship of Shakespeare" (the "Bard of Avon" since 1789), 1901, from bard + -latry "worship of," with connective -o-.
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