Etymology
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sensuality (n.)

mid-14c., sensualite, "the part of man that is concerned with the senses" (now obsolete), also "lust, sinful and passionate emotion," from Old French sensualite "the five senses; impression," from Late Latin sensualitatem (nominative sensualitas) "capacity for sensation" (in Medieval Latin also "sensuality"), from Latin sensualis "endowed with feeling, sensitive," from sensus "feeling" (see sense (n.)). Chiefly "animal instincts and appetites," hence "the lower nature regarded as a source of evil, the lusts of the flesh and their unrestrained gratification" (1620s).

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sensual (adj.)

early 15c., "carnal, concerning the body" (in distinction from the spirit or intellect);" mid-15c., "of, affecting, or pertaining to the (physical) senses" (a meaning now obsolete), from Old French sensual, sensuel (15c.) and directly from Late Latin sensualis "endowed with feeling" (see sensuality).

The specific meaning "connected with gratification of the senses" is from late 15c., especially "lewd, unchaste, devoted to voluptuous pleasures." Related: Sensually.

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lechery (n.)

"lewdness in living, habitual lustful indulgence," c. 1200, from Old French lecherie "gluttony, sensuality, lewdness," from lecheor "debauched man" (see lecher).

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carnality (n.)

early 15c., "sensuality, fleshly lusts or desires," from Late Latin carnalitas, from Latin carnalis "of the flesh" (see carnal). The meaning "state of being flesh, fleshliness" is from mid-15c.

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lecherous (adj.)

"prone to indulge in sensuality, lustful, lewd," c. 1300, probably from lecher + -ous; or else from rare Old French adjective lecheros. The nativized form is lickerish. Related: Lecherously; lecherousness.

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roue (n.)

"debauchee, man devoted to a life of pleasure and sensuality," especially in relation to women, 1800, from French roué "dissipated man, rake," originally the past participle of rouer "to break (someone) on the wheel" (15c.), from Latin rotare "roll" (see rotary).

Traditionally said to have been first applied in French c. 1720 to dissolute friends of the Duke of Orleans (regent of France 1715-23), to suggest the punishment they deserved; but it is probably rather from a secondary, figurative sense in French of "jaded, worn out," from the notion of "broken, run-over, beat down."

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Baal 

name of a Semitic solar deity worshiped, especially by the Phoenicians and Carthaginians, "with much license and sensuality" [Century Dictionary], late 14c., Biblical, from Late Latin Baal, Greek Baal, from Hebrew Ba'al, literally "owner, master, lord," a title applied to any deity (including Jehovah; see Hosea ii.16), but later a name of the particular Phoenician solar deity; from ba'al "he took possession of," also "he married;" related to or derived from the Akkadian god-name Belu (source of Hebrew Bel), name of Marduk.

It is identical with the first element in Beelzebub and the second in Hannibal ("grace of Baal") and Hasdrubal ("help of Baal"). The name has been used figuratively in English for any "false god."

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