Etymology
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sensitive (adj.)
late 14c., in reference to the body or its parts, "having the function of sensation;" also (early 15c.) "pertaining to the faculty of the soul that receives and analyzes sensory information;" from Old French sensitif "capable of feeling" (13c.) and directly from Medieval Latin sensitivus "capable of sensation," from Latin sensus, past participle of sentire "feel perceive" (see sense (n.)).

Meaning "easily affected" (with reference to mental feelings) first recorded 1816; meaning "having intense physical sensation" is from 1849. Original meaning is preserved in sensitive plant (1630s), which is "mechanically irritable in a higher degree than almost any other plant" [Century Dictionary]. Meaning "involving national security" is recorded from 1953. Related: Sensitively; sensitiveness.
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sensitize (v.)
1856, in photography; see sensitive + -ize. Of persons from 1880. Related: Sensitized; sensitizing.
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sensitivity (n.)
1803, from sensitive + -ity. Sensitivity training attested by 1954.
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oversensitive (adj.)

also over-sensitive, "excessively sensitive," by 1798, from over- + sensitive. Related: Oversensitively; oversensitiveness.

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hypersensitive (adj.)
1827, a hybrid from hyper- "over, exceedingly, to excess" + sensitive. Related: Hypersensitivity; hypersensitiveness.
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insensitive (adj.)
c. 1600, "having little or no reaction to what is perceived by one's senses," from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + sensitive. For sense, see insensate. From 1834 as "having little or no mental or moral sensitiveness;" meaning "without consideration for the feelings of others" attested by 1974. Related: Insensitively.
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feelings (n.)
"tender or sensitive side of one's nature," 1771, from plural of feeling.
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marijuana (n.)

a preparation of Cannabis sativa for use as an intoxicant, generally by smoking, 1918, altered by influence of Spanish proper name Maria Juana "Mary Jane" from mariguan (1894), from Mexican Spanish marihuana, which is of uncertain origin. As the plant was not native to Mexico, a native source for the word seems unlikely.

Marijuana ... makes you sensitive. Courtesy has a great deal to do with being sensitive. Unfortunately marijuana makes you the kind of sensitive where you insist on everyone listening to the drum solo in Iron Butterfly's 'In-a-Gadda-Da-Vida' fifty or sixty times. [P.J. O'Rourke, "Modern Manners," 1983]
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amour-propre (n.)

1775, French, "sensitive self-love, self-esteem;" see amour and proper.

Vanity usually gives the meaning as well, &, if as well, then better. [Fowler]

Middle English had it, translated, as proper love "self-love."

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high-strung (adj.)
also high strung, 1848 in the figurative sense, "having a sensitive nervous system," from high (adv.) + strung. In literal use a musical term, in reference to stringed instruments, attested from 1748.
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