Etymology
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sensible (adj.)

late 14c., "capable of sensation or feeling;" also "capable of being sensed or felt, perceptible to the senses," hence "perceptible to the mind, easily understood; logical, reasonable," from Old French sensible and directly from Late Latin sensibilis "having feeling: perceptible by the senses," from sensus, past participle of sentire "to perceive, feel" (see sense (n.)).

Of persons, from c. 1400 as "capable of mental perception, having good sense, clever, discerning;" by early 15c. as "aware, cognizant (of something)." Of actions, discourse, etc., "marked by or proceeding from (good) sense," 1650s. In reference to clothes, shoes, etc., "practical rather than fashionable," it is attested from 1855.

Other Middle English senses included "susceptible to injury or pain" (early 15c., common through 18c., now gone with sensitive); "worldly, temporal, outward" (c. 1400); "carnal, unspiritual" (early 15c., now gone with sensual). Related: Sensibleness.

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sensibly (adv.)

late 14c., sensibli, "in a manner perceived to the senses," from sensible + -ly (2). From 1670s as "in an appreciable degree;" the meaning "with good sense" is attested from 1755.

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insensible (adj.)
c. 1400, "lacking the power to feel with the senses, numb, dazed" (now rare in this meaning), from Late Latin insensibilis "that cannot be felt," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + sensibilis "having feeling: perceptible by the senses" (see sensible). Meaning "void of feeling, not susceptible to emotion or passion" is from 1610s. Meaning "incapable of being felt or perceived by the senses or the mind, so small or slight as to be imperceptible" is from late 14c. Compare insensate.
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common-sensical (adj.)

1839, from common sense, with ending as in nonsensical, etc. Common-sensible is attested from 1848.

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level-headed (adj.)
also levelheaded, "sensible, shrewd," 1869, from level (adj.) + -headed. The notion is of "mentally balanced." Related: Levelheadedness.
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grow up (v.)
"advance toward maturity," 1530s, from grow (v.) + up (adv.). As a command to be sensible, from 1951.
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phosphorescent (adj.)

shining with a faint light or luminosity like that of phosphorus, luminous without sensible heat," "1766, from Modern Latin phosphorus (see phosphorus) + -escent. Related: Phosphorescently.

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unreasonable (adj.)
mid-14c., "irrational, illogical," from un- (1) "not" + reasonable. From late 14c. as "excessive, going beyond what is sensible or realistic." Related: Unreasonably; unreasonableness.
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Sophronia 

fem. proper name, from Greek sōphrōnia, from sōphrōn (genitive sōphrōnos) "discreet, prudent, sensible, having control over sensual desires, moderate, chaste," literally "of sound mind," from sōs "safe, sound, whole" + phrēn "heart, mind" (see phreno-).

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measurable (adj.)

c. 1300, "moderate, modest, discreet" (a sense now obsolete), from Old French mesurable "restrained, moderate, sensible; restricted," from Late Latin mensurabilis, from mensurare "to measure," from Latin mensura "a measuring, a measurement; thing to measure by," from mensus, past participle of metiri "to measure," from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure." Meaning "that can be measured" is from mid-14c. Related: Measurably.

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