Etymology
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senseless (adj.)

1550s, of persons or their bodies, "without sensation, incapable of feeling," from sense (n.) + -less. By 1580s as "in a state of unconsciousness." Of actions, words, etc., "devoid of purpose, proceeding from lack of intelligence," also "without meaning, contrary to reason or sound judgment" (the senses usually are indistinguishable), it is attested by 1570s. Related: Senselessly; senselessness. There was a senseful "full of meaning; perceptive, aware" (1590s) but it seems not to have been wanted and is obsolete.

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mindless (adj.)

c. 1400, "unmindful, heedless, negligent," also "senseless, beside oneself, irrational, wanting power of thought," from mind (n.) + -less. Related: Mindlessly; mindlessness. Old English had myndleas "foolish, senseless."

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garrote (v.)
"to execute with a garrote," 1845, from garrote (n.); sense of "choke senseless and then rob" is from 1852. Related: Garotted; garotting.
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gabble (n.)
"senseless, loud, rapid talk; animal noise," c. 1600, from gabble (v.).
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absurdity (n.)

late 15c., absurdite, "that which is absurd," from Late Latin absurditatem (nominative absurditas) "dissonance, incongruity," noun of state from Latin absurdus "out of tune;" figuratively "incongruous, silly, senseless" (see absurd).

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stupefy (v.)
early 15c., from Latin stupefacere "make stupid or senseless, benumb, stun," from stupere "be stunned" (see stupid) + facere "to make, to do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").
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drivel (n.)

early 14c., drevel "saliva, slaver," from drivel (v.). Meaning "senseless twaddle, idiotic speech or writing" is by 1852.

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stupendous (adj.)
1660s, correction of earlier stupendious "causing astonishment, astounding" (1540s), from Late Latin stupendus "to be wondered at," gerundive of Latin stupere "be stunned, be struck senseless, be aghast, astounded, or amazed" (see stupid). Related: Stupendously; stupendousness.
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anesthetic (adj.)

1846, "insensible;" 1847, "producing temporary loss of sensation," with -ic + Latinized form of Greek anaisthētos "insensate, without feeling; senseless, tactless, stupid" (see anesthesia). The noun meaning "agent that produces anesthesia" was first used in the modern sense 1848 by Scottish doctor James Young Simpson (1811-1870), pioneer in the surgical use of chloroform.

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apoplectic (adj.)

1610s, "involving apoplexy," from French apoplectique (16c.), from Latin apoplecticus, from Greek apoplektikos "disabled by a stroke, crippled, struck dumb, senseless; crippled, palsied," extended form of apoplektos, verbal adjective of apoplessein "strike down and incapacitate" (see apoplexy). The meaning "showing symptoms of apoplexy" (1721) gradually shaded into "enraged, very angry" by early 19c. The noun meaning "one suffering apoplexy" is from 1660s.

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