Etymology
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selection (n.)

1620s, "act of selecting," from Latin selectionem (nominative selectio) "a choosing out, choice, selection," noun of action from past-participle stem of seligere "choose out, single out, select; separate, cull" (see select (adj.)). Meaning "thing selected" is from 1805. Biological sense is from 1837; applied to actions of breeders (methodical selection), hence its use by Darwin (natural selection; 1857). French sélection is a 19c. borrowing from English.

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preselection (n.)

also pre-selection, "selection beforehand," 1882, from pre- "before" + selection.

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eclogue (n.)
"short poem," especially a pastoral dialogue, mid-15c., from Latin ecloga "selection, short poem, eclogue," from Greek ekloge "a selection," especially of poems, from eklegein "to pick out, select," from ek "out" (see ex-) + legein "gather, choose," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather."
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excerpt (n.)

"an extract from a written or printed work," 1630s, from Latin excerptum "an extract, selection," noun use of neuter past participle of excerpere "to extract" (see excerpt (v.)). Related: excerpts.

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cull (n.1)

1610s, "a selection, something picked out," from cull (v.). From 1791 as "flock animal selected as inferior;" 1958 as "a killing of animals deemed inferior."

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survival (n.)
1590s, "act of surviving; continuation after some event," from survive + -al (2). Phrase survival of the fittest (1864) was used by Spencer in place of Darwin's natural selection.
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Darwinism (n.)

1864, "body of biological doctrine proposed by Charles Darwin," especially "the theory of species evolution by natural selection," from the name of English naturalist Charles Darwin (1809-1882). His major works were "The Origin of Species" (1859) and "The Descent of Man" (1871), + -ism.

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Darwinian (adj.)

1794, "of or pertaining to the work or thought of English Enlightenment thinker Erasmus Darwin;" 1860 in reference to his grandson, Charles, the biologist. As a noun, 1808 in reference to Erasmus; 1869 as "one who favors or accepts the theory of species evolution by natural selection proposed by Charles Darwin." See Darwin. Related: Darwinianism.

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pericope (n.)

"an extract, a selection from a book," especially "a passage of Scripture appointed to be read on certain occasions," 1650s, from Late Latin pericope "section of a book," from Greek perikopē "a section" of a book, literally "a cutting all round," from peri "around, about" (see peri-) + kopē "a cutting" (see hatchet).

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election (n.)

c. 1300, eleccioun, "act of choosing" someone to occupy a position, elevation to office" (whether by one person or a body of electors); also "the holding of a vote by a body of electors by established procedure; the time and place of such a vote," from Anglo-French eleccioun, Old French elecion "choice, election, selection" (12c.), from Latin electionem (nominative electio) "a choice, selection," noun of action from past-participle stem of eligere "pick out, select," from ex "out" (see ex-) + -ligere, combining form of legere "to choose," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather."

In Middle English also "act of choosing" generally, "choice, free choice" (c. 1400). The theological sense of "God's choice of someone" for eternal life is from late 14c. Meaning "act of choosing, choice" is from c. 1400.

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