Etymology
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secondary (adj.)

late 14c., secondarie, "belonging to the second class; not chief or principal; second in importance or authority; of a lesser quality or worth; subordinate to something else, depending upon the action of primary qualities," from Old French secondaire and directly from Latin secundarius "pertaining to the second class, inferior," from secundus (see second (adj.)).

Opposed to primary (adj.) or principal (adj.). Of colors, under the old theory, from 1831; in reference to schools or education, from 1809. Of characteristics peculiar to one sex but not necessary for reproduction, from 1780. Related: Secondarily; secondariness.

As a noun from mid-15c. as "thing or place of secondary importance or which is dependent on a primary;" 1590s as "a delegate or deputy." The U.S. football sense of "defensive backfield" is by 1955.

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aging (n.)

also ageing, "process of imparting age or the qualities of age to," 1860, verbal noun from age (v.).

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progeria (n.)

fatal genetic disease of children causing rapid aging, 1902, Modern Latin, from Greek progeros "prematurely old;" from pro "before, sooner" (see pro-) + geras "old man" (see geriatric) + abstract noun ending -ia.

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by-name (n.)

late 14c., "secondary name;" 1570s, "nickname," from by + name (n.).

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by-product (n.)

also byproduct, "secondary or additional product;" 1849, from by + product.

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epiphenomenon (n.)

"secondary symptom," 1706, from epi- + phenomenon. Plural is epiphenomena. Related: Epiphenomenal.

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senescent (adj.)

"growing old, aging," 1650s, from Latin senescentem (nominative scenescens), present participle of senescere "to grow old," from senex "old" (from PIE root *sen- "old").

Blount's "Glossographia" (1656) also has a verb senesce "to wax old, to grow in age, to begin to decay or wear away," from Latin, and OED has quotes for it from Stevenson, Shaw, and J.D. Salinger.

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slug (n.3)

"a hard blow," 1830, dialectal, of uncertain origin; perhaps related to slaughter or perhaps a secondary form of slay.

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slag (v.)

"denigrate," by 1971, from slag (n.) in a secondary sense of "worthless person" (1788). Related: Slagged; slagging.

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crankum (n.)

"a 'twist,' an eccentricity," 1822, mock-Latin formation from crank (n.) in the secondary sense.

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