Etymology
Advertisement
seasoned (adj.)
mid-15c., "flavored, spiced," past-participle adjective from season (v.). Meaning "fit for use" is from 1540s; that of "acclimatized, accustomed" is from 1640s.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
pepperoni (n.)

"beef and pork sausage seasoned with pepper," by 1904, from Italian peperone "chilli," from pepe (see pepper (n.)).

Related entries & more 
forcemeat (n.)
also force-meat, "mincemeat, meat chopped fine and seasoned," 1680s, from force "to stuff," a variant of farce (q.v.) + meat.
Related entries & more 
edamame (n.)

fresh green soya beans in the pod, boiled, seasoned, and served as an appetizer, 1951, from Japanese, said to mean literally "twig bean."

Related entries & more 
bruschetta (n.)

garlic bread, 1967, from Italian bruschetta, Tuscan name for bread roasted on both sides, dribbled with olive oil and sometimes seasoned with garlic, from bruscare "to roast over coals."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
chorizo (n.)

"spiced pork sausage," 1846, from Spanish chorizo, ultimately from Medieval Latin salsicia "sausage" from Latin salsicus "seasoned with salt" (see sausage).

Related entries & more 
warhorse (n.)
also war-horse, 1650s, "powerful horse ridden into war," from war (n.) + horse (n.). Figurative sense of "seasoned veteran" of anything is attested from 1837. In reference to women perceived as tough, by 1921.
Related entries & more 
stuffing (n.)
1520s, "material used for filling a cushion;" 1530s, "seasoned mixture used to stuff fowls before cooking," verbal noun from stuff (v.) in the sense "fill the inside of a bird before cooking" (late 14c.).
Related entries & more 
croquette (n.)

"mass of finely minced and seasoned meat or fish made into small balls and fried," 1706, from French croquette (17c.), from croquer "to crunch" (imitative) + diminutive suffix -ette.

Related entries & more 
sausage (n.)
mid-15c., sawsyge, from Old North French saussiche (Modern French saucisse), from Vulgar Latin *salsica "sausage," from salsicus "seasoned with salt," from Latin salsus "salted," from past participle of Old Latin sallere "to salt," from sal (genitive salis) "salt" (from PIE root *sal- "salt").
Related entries & more