Etymology
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scribe (n.)

late 12c., "professional interpreter of the Jewish Law" (late 11c. as a surname), from Church Latin scriba "teacher of Jewish law," used in Vulgate to render Greek grammateus (corresponding to Hebrew sopher "writer, scholar"). It is a special use of Latin scriba "keeper of accounts, secretary, writer," an agent noun from the past-participle stem of scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut").

The sense "one who writes, official or public writer" in English is from late 14c. That of "copyist, transcriber of manuscripts" is from 1530s. Used loosely for "an author, one fond of writing" by 1580s.

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scribe (v.)

mid-15c., scriben, "to write," from Latin scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut"). The carpentry sense "mark or score with (an outline)" is from 1670s, of uncertain origin, perhaps a shortening of describe. Related: Scribed; scriber; scribing.

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scribal (adj.)

1857, "of or pertaining to a scribe or penman;" 1863, "of or pertaining to doctors of Jewish law;"  from scribe (n.) + -al (1). 

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*skribh- 
*skrībh-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to cut, separate, sift;" an extended form of root *sker- (1) "to cut."

It forms all or part of: ascribe; ascription; circumscribe; conscript; conscription; describe; description; festschrift; inscribe; inscription; manuscript; postscript; prescribe; prescription; proscribe; sans-serif; scribble; scribe; script; scriptorium; scripture; scrivener; serif; shrift; shrive; subscribe; superscribe; superscript; transcribe; scarification; scarify.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek skariphasthai "to scratch an outline, sketch;" Latin scribere "to write" (to carve marks in wood, stone, clay, etc.); Lettish skripat "scratch, write;" Old Norse hrifa "scratch."
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scribble (v.)

mid-15c., scriblen, "to write (something) quickly and carelessly, without regard to correctness or elegance," from Medieval Latin scribillare, diminutive of Latin scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut"). Or perhaps a native formation from Middle English scriben "to write" (see scribe (v.)) + diminutive suffix -el (3). Classical Latin had conscribillare. The sense of "make unintelligible tangled lines on paper out of idleness or for amusement" is modern. Related: Scribbled; scribbling.

The noun, "hurried or careless writing," is 1570s, from the verb. The 19c. writers enjoyed the sound of scribble, based on their many elaborations of it in describing one another: scribblage, scribblative, scribblatory, scribbleable, scribbledom, but the 17c., beat them to two of the best: scribblement and scribble-wit.

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librarian (n.)
"custodian of a library," 1713; see library + -an. Earlier form was library-keeper (1640s), and librarian had been used in the sense "scribe, one who copies books" (1660s).
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Ezra 
masc. proper name, in Old Testament name of a celebrated 5c. B.C.E. scribe, from Late Latin, from Hebrew Ezra, contraction of Azaryah(u), literally "God has helped," from ezer "help" + Yah, a shortened form of Yahweh "God."
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Tironian 

of or pertaining to Marcus Tullius Tiro, Cicero's scribe and namesake, 1828, especially in reference to the Tironian Notes (Latin notæ Tironianæ), a system of shorthand said to have been invented by him (see ampersand).

Although involving long training and considerable strain on the memory, this system seems to have practically answered all the purposes of modern stenography. It was still in familiar use as late as the ninth century. [Century Dictionary]
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scrivener (n.)

"professional penman, copyist, amanuensis, clerk," late 14c. (early 13c. as a surname), with superfluous -er + scrivein "scribe" (c. 1300, c. 1200 as a surname), from Anglo-French escrivin, Old French escrivain "a writer, notary, clerk" (Modern French écrivain), from Vulgar Latin *scribanem accusative of scriba "a scribe," from scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut"). For the dropping of Latin soft medial -b- to aspirated -v- in French, compare debere/devoir, caballum/cheval, habere/avoir, etc.

Middle English also had scrivable "suitable for being written on" (c. 1400); an adverb scrivenish (late 14c.); scrivenrie "craft or occupation of writing" (mid-15c.). A back-formed verb scriven "to write," especially in the wordy and repetitive style of legal documents, is attested by 1680s.

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homoioteleuton (n.)

 in general, "the repetition of endings in words, rhyme and near rhyme," but also, in palaeography, a form of scribal error which occurs "when two words/phrases/lines end with the same sequence of letters. The scribe, having finished copying the first, skips to the second, omitting all intervening words" [Robert B. Waltz, "The Encyclopedia of New Testament Textual Criticism," 2013]; Greek, literally "same ending;" see homo- (1) "the same" + telos.

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