Etymology
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scrap (n.1)
"small piece," late 14c., from Old Norse skrap "scraps, trifles," from skrapa "to scrape, scratch, cut" (see scrape (v.)). Meaning "remains of metal produced after rolling or casting" is from 1790. Scrap iron first recorded 1794.
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scrap (n.2)
"fight," 1846, possibly a variant of scrape (n.1) on the notion of "an abrasive encounter." Weekley and OED suggest obsolete colloquial scrap "scheme, villainy, vile intention" (1670s).
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scrap (v.2)
"to fight, brawl, box," 1867, colloquial, from scrap (n.2). Related: Scrapped; scrapping.
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scrap (v.1)
"to make into scrap," 1883 (of old locomotives), from scrap (n.1). Related: Scrapped; scrapping.
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scrappy (adj.)
"consisting of scraps," 1837, from scrap (n.1) + -y (2). Meaning "inclined to fight" (1895) is from scrap (v.2). Related: Scrappily; scrappiness.
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scrapper (n.)
"pugilist," 1874, agent noun from scrap (v.2). Later used generally of anyone or anything that tends to put up a fight.
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scrapyard (n.)
also scrap-yard, 1875, from scrap (n.1) + yard (n.1).
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scrapbook (n.)
also scrap-book, 1821, from scrap (n.1) + book (n.). As a verb, by 1879. Related: Scrapbooked; scrapbooking.
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scrapple (n.)
"scraps of pork and cornmeal seasoned, boiled, and pressed into large cakes," 1850, probably a diminutive form of scrap (n.1) with -el (2). Noted especially, and perhaps originally, as a regional favorite dish in and around Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
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