Etymology
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Scotland 
named for the Scots, who settled there from Ireland 5c.-6c.; their name is of unknown origin (see Scot). Latin Scotia began to appear 9c. as the name for the region, replacing older Caledonia, also named for the inhabitants at the time, whose name likewise is of unknown origin.
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Scotland Yard (n.)
used for "London Metropolitan Police," 1864, from the name of short street off Whitehall, London; where from 1829 to 1890 stood the headquarters of the Metropolitan Police Force, hence, the force itself, especially the detective branch. After 1890, located in "New Scotland Yard."
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Drambuie (n.)

1893, proprietary name of a whiskey liqueur manufactured in Scotland, said by the manufacturer to be from Gaelic dram buidheach, literally "satisfying drink."

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Alison 
also Allison, fem. proper name popular in England and Scotland 13c.-17c., from French Alison, a pet form of Alice. As a surname, from this or representing "Alice's son" or in some cases "Alan's son."
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Caledonia 
ancient Roman name for part of northern Britain, taken from the name of its former inhabitants, which is of unknown origin, presumably Celtic. Since 18c. applied poetically to Scotland or the Scottish Highlands. Related: Caledonian.
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Cheviot (n.)

range of hills between Scotland and England, named for one of them, The Cheviot, attested from 12c. as Chiviet. The name is of uncertain origin; the second element is perhaps Old English geat "gate." As a breed of sheep, 1815.

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Clydesdale 
"breed of heavy draught horses," 1786, so called because they were bred in the valley of the Clyde in Scotland. The river name is perhaps literally "cleansing," from a Celtic root akin to Latin cloaca (see cloaca).
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Orkney 

group of islands off the north coast of Scotland, from Old Norse Orkney-jar "Seal Islands," from orkn "seal," which is probably imitative of its bark. With Old Norse ey "island" (compare Jersey). Related: Orcadian; Orkneyman.

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Argyle (n.)
"diamond-shaped pattern of two or more colors in fabric," said to be so called from similarity to tartans worn by Campbell clan of Argyll, Scotland. The place name is literally "land of the Gaels," with first element from Old Irish airer "country." Argyle socks is from 1935.
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Cameron 
Highland clan name, from Gaelic camshron "wry or hooked nose" (the Highland clan; the Lowland name is for a locality in Fife). The Cameronians (1680s) were followers of Richard Cameron in Scotland who refused to accept the indulgence of Charles II during the prosecution of the Presbyterians.
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