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Scotland 
named for the Scots, who settled there from Ireland 5c.-6c.; their name is of unknown origin (see Scot). Latin Scotia began to appear 9c. as the name for the region, replacing older Caledonia, also named for the inhabitants at the time, whose name likewise is of unknown origin.
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Scotland Yard (n.)
used for "London Metropolitan Police," 1864, from the name of short street off Whitehall, London; where from 1829 to 1890 stood the headquarters of the Metropolitan Police Force, hence, the force itself, especially the detective branch. After 1890, located in "New Scotland Yard."
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Glasgow 
city in Scotland, from Gaelic, literally "green hollow," from glas "green, verdant" + cau "hollow."
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pringle (n.)

"small silver coin of about the value of a penny," formerly current in Scotland and northern England, 1680s, a word of unknown origin.

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Shetland 
group of islands north of Scotland, from Old Norse Hjaltland; in reference to a type of pony, 1801; as a breed of sheep, 1794.
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Seven Champions (n.)
1590s, the national saints of England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland, France, Spain, and Italy, viz. George, Andrew, David, Patrick, Denys, James, and Anthony.
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butterscotch (n.)

toffee-like confection, 1802, from butter (n.), which is a main ingredient; the second element uncertain; perhaps from its having been made in Scotland.

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highland (n.)
Old English heohlond "mountainous country;" see high (adj.) + land (n.). Highlands "mountainous district of Scotland" first recorded early 15c.
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Drambuie (n.)

1893, proprietary name of a whiskey liqueur manufactured in Scotland, said by the manufacturer to be from Gaelic dram buidheach, literally "satisfying drink."

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croft (n.)

"small piece of enclosed ground for agricultural purposes, a very small farm," especially of those on the western coast and isles of Scotland. Old English croft "enclosed field, small field," of unknown etymology. Germanic and Celtic sources have been proposed.

Crofter "tenant who holds a small field, one who occupies a croft," especially "small farmer on the western coast and islands of Scotland," is by 1762 (from late 13c. as a surname), originally Scottish.

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