Etymology
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scope (n.1)

[extent] 1530s, "room to act, free play," also literal (1550s), "room to move in, space;" from Italian scopo "aim, purpose, object; thing aimed at, mark, target," from Latin scopus, from Greek skopos "aim, target, object of attention;" also "watcher, one who watches," which according to Watkins is from a metathesized form of PIE *spek-yo-, suffixed form of root *spek- "to observe." Beekes writes that the the old IE root noun (as in Latin haruspex) from *spek- apparently was replaced in Greek by skopos

It is attested from 1550s as "that which is aimed at or desired," hence "ultimate aim;" the classical sense of "a mark to aim or shoot at" was in English by 1560s but now is obsolete. Hence "object a speaker or writer has in view" (1530s). The sense of "intellectual range, distance the mind can reach" is recorded from c. 1600. By 1590s as "extent in space." By 1830 as "sphere in which some activity operates." Elizabethan scopious "spacious, wide" did not stick.

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scope (n.2)

[instrument for viewing] 1872, shortened from telescope, microscope, etc., in which the element (Latinized) is from Greek skopein "to look" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). Earlier used as a shortening of horoscope (c. 1600). Extended to radar screens, etc., by 1945 as a shortening of oscilloscope.

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scope (v.)

1807, "calculate the scope of," from scope (n.1). The slang meaning "to look at, view" is by 1980s, from scope (n.2). Related: Scoped; scoping.

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CinemaScope (n.)

1953, proprietary name for wide-screen movie technology; see cinema + scope (n.2).

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scopeless (adj.)

"having no purpose or aim,; affording no opportunity," 1660s, from scope (n.1) + -less. Related: Scopelessly; scopelessness.

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spectroscope (n.)
1861, from spectro- + -scope. A Greek-Latin hybrid, both elements from the same PIE root. Related: Spectroscopic; spectroscopy.
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-scope 
word-forming element indicating "an instrument for seeing," from Late Latin -scopium, from Greek -skopion, from skopein "to look at, examine" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe").
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ophthalmoscope (n.)

"instrument for viewing the interior of the eye," especially the retina, 1857 in English; coined 1852 by German physician and physicist Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholtz; see ophthalmo- + -scope.

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cystoscopy (n.)

1910, "examination of the bladder with a cystoscope" (1889), from Latinized combining form of Greek kystis "bladder" (which is of unknown origin) + -scope. Related: Cystoscopic.

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fluoroscopy (n.)
1896, from fluoroscope (1896) "device for observing x-rays by means of action in fluorescent substances," from fluoro- + -scope. Related: Fluoroscopic.
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