Etymology
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scold (n.)
mid-12c., "person of ribald speech," later "person fond of abusive language" (c. 1300), especially a shrewish woman [Johnson defines it as "A clamourous, rude, mean, low, foul-mouthed woman"], from Old Norse skald "poet" (see skald). The sense evolution might reflect the fact that Germanic poets (like their Celtic counterparts) were famously feared for their ability to lampoon and mock (as in skaldskapr "poetry," also, in Icelandic law books, "libel in verse").
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scold (v.)
late 14c., "be abusive or quarrelsome," from scold (n.). Related: Scolded; scolding.
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tongue-lash (v.)
"scold, abuse with words," 1857, from tongue (n.) + lash (v.). Related: Tongue-lashing.
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bullyrag (v.)
"to bully, badger, scold," 1790, ballarag, of uncertain origin; early spellings suggest it is not connected to bully.
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flite (v.)
"to scold," c. 1500, earlier "to content with words, chide, wrangle," from Old English flitan, cognate with Old High German flizzan "to strive." Related: Flited; fliting.
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chide (v.)

late 12c., "scold, nag, rail," originally intransitive, from Old English cidan "to contend, quarrel, complain." Not found outside Old English (though Liberman says it is "probably related to OHG *kîdal 'wedge,'" with a sense evolution from "brandishing sticks" to "scold, reprove").

Originally a weak verb, later strong constructions are by influence of ride/rode, etc. Past tense, past participle can be chided or chid or even (past participle) chidden (Shakespeare used it); present participle is chiding.

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berate (v.)

"to scold vehemently," 1540s, from be- "thoroughly" + Middle English rate "to scold" (late 14c.), from Old French reter "accuse, blame," from Latin reputare "reflect upon, reckon, count over," from re- "repeatedly" (see re-) + putare "to judge, suppose, believe, suspect," originally "to clean, trim, prune" (from PIE root *pau- (2) "to cut, strike, stamp"). "Obsolete except in U.S." [OED 1st ed.], but it seems to have revived in Britain 20c. Related: Berated; berating.

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rag (v.)

1739, "to scold," a word of unknown origin; perhaps related to Danish dialectal rag "grudge." Compare bullyrag, ballarag "intimidate" (1807). Weakened sense of "annoy, tease, harass roughly" is student slang, by 1808. Related: Ragged; ragging.

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jaw (v.)
1610s, "to catch in the jaws, devour," from jaw (n.). In slang from 1748, "to gossip, to speak;" 1810 as "to scold." Related: Jawed; jawing. Hence 19c. U.S. slang jawsmith "talkative person; loud-mouthed demagogue" (1887), nautical slang jaw-tackle "the mouth" (1829), and the back-formed colloquial noun jaw "rude talk, abusive clamor" (1748).
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brawl (v.)
late 14c., braulen "to cry out, scold, quarrel," probably related to Dutch brallen "to boast," or from French brailler "to shout noisily," frequentative of braire "to bray" (see bray (v.)). Meaning "quarrel, wrangle, squabble" is from early 15c. Related: Brawled; brawler; brawling.
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