Etymology
Advertisement
humour 
chiefly British English spelling of humor; see -or. Related: Humourous; humourously; humourist; humourless, etc.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
schoolboy (n.)

also school-boy, "boy attending school," 1580s, from school (n.1) + boy. As an adjective from 1874. Phrase every schoolboy knows, in reference to basic factual information, is by 1650s (Jeremy Taylor). Related: Schoolboyish.

Related entries & more 
Bobadil (n.)
"blustering braggart," from the name of a boastful character in Ben Jonson's "Every Man in his Humour" (1598).
Related entries & more 
bumf (n.)
"papers, paperwork," 1889, British schoolboy slang, originally "toilet-paper," from bum-fodder; see bum (n.1) + fodder.
Related entries & more 
spitball (n.)
1846 in the schoolboy sense, "bit of paper chewed and rounded as a missile;" 1904 in the baseball sense, from spit (n.1) + ball (n.1).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
bungee (n.)
1930, "elastic rope," probably an extended use of the identical word used in late 19c. British schoolboy slang for "rubber eraser;" this probably is more or less onomatopoeic, from notions of bouncy + spongy. First record of bungee jumping is from 1979.
Related entries & more 
flog (v.)
1670s, slang, of uncertain origin. Perhaps a schoolboy shortening of Latin flagellare "flagellate" (see flagellum); Century Dictionary suggests perhaps from a Low German word "of homely use, of which the early traces have disappeared." OED finds it presumably onomatopoeic. Figurative use from 1800. Related: Flogged; flogging.
Related entries & more 
-er (3)
suffix used to make jocular or familiar formations from common or proper names (soccer being one), first attested 1860s, English schoolboy slang, "Introduced from Rugby School into Oxford University slang, orig. at University College, in Michaelmas Term, 1875" [OED, with unusual precision].
Related entries & more 
broadcasting (n.)

1922, verbal noun from broadcast (v.).

Broadcasting, as distinct from wireless communication, may be said to have come into being about 1920. It may be defined as the systematic diffusion, by radio telephony, of music, lectures, drama, humour, news and information bulletins, speeches and ceremonies, pictures and other matter susceptible of appreciation by a scattered audience, individually or in groups, with appropriate receiving apparatus. [Encyclopedia Britannica, 1929]
Related entries & more