Etymology
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schedule (n.)

late 14c., sedule, cedule "ticket, label, slip of paper with writing on it" (a sense now obsolete), from Old French cedule (Modern French cédule), from Late Latin schedula "strip of paper" (in Medieval Latin also "a note, schedule"), diminutive of Latin scheda, scida "one of the strips forming a papyrus sheet," from Greek skhidē "splinter," from stem of skhizein "to cleave, split" (see shed (v.)). Also from the Latin word are Spanish cédula, German Zettel.

Especially slips of paper attached to a document as an appendix, stating details in a tabular form or listing names or particulars (a sense maintained in U.S. tax forms). The specific meaning "printed timetable" is recorded by 1863 in railway use. The modern spelling began 15c. in imitation of Latin, was regular from mid-17c., but pronunciation remained "sed-yul" for centuries afterward. The modern British pronunciation ("shed-yul") is from French influence, while the U.S. pronunciation ("sked-yul") is from the practice of Webster, based on the Greek original.

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schedule (v.)

1855, "make a schedule of;" 1862, "include in a schedule;" from schedule (n.). Related: Scheduled; scheduling.

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sked (n.)

colloquial shortening of schedule (n.), U.S. student slang from 1929.

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scheduling (n.)

"the preparation of timetables for complex operations," by 1894, verbal noun from schedule (v.).

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reschedule (v.)

also re-schedule, "replan in accordance with a different timetable," 1912, from re- "back, again" + schedule (v.). Related: Rescheduled; rescheduling.

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slate (v.)

1520s, "to cover with slates" (earlier sclatten, late 15c.), from slate (n.). Meaning "propose, schedule" is from 1883; earlier "to nominate" (1804); the notion is of writing on a slate board. Related: Slated; slating.

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billet (n.2)

"small paper, short document, note," mid-15c., earlier "an official register, roll, or record" (late 13c.), from Anglo-French billette "list, schedule," diminutive of bille "written statement" (see bill (n.1)) with -let.

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relegation (n.)

"act of relegating, banishment," 1580s, from Latin relegationem (nominative relegatio) "a sending away, exiling, banishing," a specific term in ancient Roman law and later ecclesiastical law, noun of action from past-participle stem of relegare "remove, dismiss, banish, send away, schedule, put aside" (see relegate).

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rental (n.)

late 14c., "rent roll, schedule or account of rents;" also "income from rents," from Anglo-French rental and Medieval Latin rentale; see rent (n.1) + -al (2). Meaning "amount charged for rent, gross amount of rents drawn from an estate" is from 1630s. In reference to a car or house let for rent, by 1952, American English. As an adjective by 1510s.

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tablature (n.)

type of musical notation for lute or stringed instrument, 1570s, from French tablature (1550s), from Italian tavolatura (also Medieval Latin tabulatura), from Late Latin tabulare, from Latin tabula "table, list, schedule" (see table (n.)). "It differed from the more general staff-notation in that it aimed to express not so much the pitch of the notes intended as the mechanical process by which on the particular instrument those tones were to be produced" [Century Dictionary].

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