Advertisement
6 entries found.
Search filter: All Results 
satin (n.)
mid-14c., from Old French satin (14c.), perhaps from Arabic (atlas) zaytuni, literally "(satin) from Zaitun," a Chinese city, perhaps modern Quanzhou in Fukien province, southern China, a major port in the Middle Ages, with a resident community of European traders. The form of the word perhaps influenced in French by Latin seta "silk." OED finds the Arabic connection etymologically untenable and takes the French word straight from Latin. As an adjective from mid-15c.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
satinette (n.)
also satinet, 1703, from French satinet, diminutive of satin (see satin). So called because it was thought to resemble satin.
Related entries & more 
sateen (n.)
"glossy cloth resembling satin," 1835, variant of satin (q.v.), perhaps influenced by velveteen, where the ending is a variant of -ine (1).
Related entries & more 
necktie (n.)

"narrow band of silk, satin, etc., worn around the neck and tied in front," 1838, from neck (n.) + tie (n.). American English slang necktie party "a lynching" is recorded from 1871.

Related entries & more 
bluchers (n.)
type of old-style boots, by 1837, from Field Marshal Gebhard Leberecht Blücher (1742-1819), in the later campaigns against Napoleon commander of the Prussian army, who is said to have taken an interest in the footwear of his soldiery. Prince Blucher demi boots were described in 1815 as "military (or half-boots), of royal purple, or dark blue morocco or kid leather, also of purple satin; a small scarlet star, embroidered on the instep, and scarlet bound; red leather buttons (covered red); thin narrow soles, made right and left; broad duck-web toes." Compare Wellington.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
couturier (n.)

"male dressmaker or fashion designer," 1885, originally as a French word in English, from French couturier, from couture "sewing, dressmaking" (see couture). Couturière "female dressmaker" is attested in English from 1818.

THE couturier—the bearded dressmaker, the masculine artist in silk and satin—is an essentially modern and Parisian phenomenon. It is true the elegant and capricious Madame de Pompadour owed most of her toilets and elegant accoutrements to the genius of Supplis, the famous tailleur pour dames, or ladies' tailor, of the epoch. But Supplis was an exception and he never assumed the name of couturier, the masculine form of couturière, "dress-maker." That appellation was reserved for the great artists of the Second Empire, Worth, Aurelly, Pingat, and their rivals, who utterly revolutionized feminine costume and endeavored to direct it in the paths of art, good taste, and comfort. ["The Parisian Couturier," Lippincott's Magazine, October 1885]
Related entries & more