Etymology
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SAT (n.)
1961, initialism (acronym) for Scholastic Aptitude Test.
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satyagraha (n.)

Indian form of passive resistance, 1920, in writings of Gandhi, from Sanskrit satyagraha "insistence on truth," from satya "truth, truthfulness" (from sat- "existing, true, virtuous," from PIE root *es- "to be") + agraha "pertinacity," from gṛbhṇāti, gṛhṇāti "he seizes" (from PIE root *ghrebh- (1) "to seize, reach;" see grab (v.)). Related: Satyagrahi.

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majlis (n.)

"assembly, council in a Middle Eastern land" (later, especially, with capital M-, the Persian national assembly), 1821, from Arabic majlis "assembly," literally "session," from jalasa "he sat down."

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ink-well (n.)
also inkwell, 1854, from ink (n.) + well (n.). A schoolroom implement, so called because it sat down in the surface of a desk in contrast to an ink-stand.
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Bodhisattva (n.)
"one of a class of beings in Mahayana Buddhism who have attained supreme wisdom," 1828, from Sanskrit, literally "one whose essence is perfect knowledge," from bodhi "perfect knowledge" (see Buddha) + sattva "reality, being," from sat-, sant- "existing, true, virtuous," from PIE root *es- "to be."
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vomitorium (n.)
1754, "passage or opening in an ancient amphitheater, leading to or from the seats," from Latin (Macrobius, Sat., VI.iv), from vomitare (see vomit (n.)) + -orium (see -ory). Meaning "place where ancient Romans (allegedly) deliberately vomited during feasts" is attested by 1869.
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Areopagus 

1640s, Greek, Areios pagos "the hill of Ares," west of the Acropolis in Athens, where the highest judicial court sat. The second element is from pagos "pinnacle, cliff, rocky hill," related to pegnunai "to fasten, coagulate" (from PIE root *pag- "to fasten"). The sense was extended to any important tribunal.

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fleshpot (n.)

from flesh (n.) + pot (n.1); literally "pot in which flesh is boiled," hence "luxuries regarded with envy," especially in fleshpots of Egypt, from Exodus xvi:3:

Whan we sat by ye Flesh pottes, and had bred ynough to eate. [Coverdale translation, 1535]
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sederunt (n.)

"a sitting, a session" of a deliberative or judicial body, 1620s, Latin, literally "there sat" (the typical opening word in records written in Latin of such proceedings, noting the members present), third person plural past tense of sedere "to sit" (from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit").

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podium (n.)

1743, in architecture, "raised platform around an ancient arena" (upon which sat persons of distinction), also "projecting base of a pedestal," from Latin podium "raised platform," from Greek podion "foot of a vase," diminutive of pous (genitive podos) "foot," from PIE root *ped- "foot." Meaning "raised platform at the front of a hall or stage" is by 1947.

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