Etymology
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sash (n.1)

[strip of cloth] 1590s, originally in reference to Oriental dress, "strip of silk, fine linen, or gauze wound round the head as a turban," from Arabic shash "muslin cloth." The general meaning "scarf or strip of cloth worn by men about the waist or over the shoulder" for ornament is recorded by 1680s.

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sash (n.2)

framed part of a window, into which the panes are fitted, 1680s, sashes, a mangled Englishing of French châssis "frame" of a window or door (see chassis).

The word was mistaken as a plural and further mangled by loss of the -s by 1704. Sash-door, one having panes of glass to admit light, is by 1726; sash-weight, attached by cords to either side of a sash to balance it and make it easier to raise and lower, is attested by 1737.

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chassis (n.)

"base frame of an automobile," 1903, American English; earlier "sliding frame or carriage-base for a large gun" (1869), "window frame" (1660s), from French châssis "frame," Old French chassiz (13c.) "frame, framework, setting," from chasse "case, box, eye socket, snail's shell, setting (of a jewel)," from Latin capsa "box, case" (see case (n.2)) + French -is, collective suffix for a number of parts taken together. Compare sash (n.2).

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sashay (v.)

1836, "perform a gliding step in dancing," a mangled Englishing of French chassé "gliding step" (in ballet), literally "chased," past participle of chasser "to chase," from Old French chacier "to hunt" (see chase (v.)).  Also compare catch, and for spelling see sash (n.2). Hence "to perform a casual walk or glide. move diagonally or irregularly," and "walk ostentatiously or provocatively." Related: Sashayed; sashaying. As a noun, "a venture, excursion," by 1900; as the name of a square-dancing step by 1940.

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cummerbund (n.)

"large, loose sash worn as a belt," 1610s, from Hindi kamarband "loin band," from Persian kamar "waist" + band "something that ties," from Avestan banda- "bond, fetter," from PIE root *bhendh- "to bind."

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bandolier (n.)
1570s, "shoulder belt" (for a wallet, etc.), from French bandouiliere (16c.), from Italian bandoliera or Spanish bandolera, from diminutive of banda "a scarf, sash," a Germanic loan-word related to Gothic bandwa (see banner). In some cases, directly from Spanish to English as bandoleer. Meaning "ammunition belt for a musket" is from 1590s; hence bandolero "highwayman, robber" (1832), from Spanish, literally "man who wears a bandoleer."
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girdle (n.)
Old English gyrdel "belt, sash, cord drawn about the waist and fastened," worn by both men and women, common Germanic (cognates: Old Norse gyrðill, Swedish gördel, Old Frisian gerdel, Dutch gordel, Old High German gurtil, German Gürtel "belt"), related to Old English gyrdan "to gird," from PIE root *gher- (1) "to grasp, enclose" with instrumental suffix -el (1). Modern euphemistic sense of "elastic corset not extending above the waist" first recorded 1925. Originally a belt to secure the clothes, also for carrying a purse, a weapon, keys, etc.
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casement (n.)
type of hinged sash-window that swings open like doors, early 15c., originally "hollow molding, frame for glass," probably a shortening of Old French dialectal enchassement "window frame" (Modern French enchâssement), from en- "in," prefix forming verbs, + casse "case, frame" (see case (n.2)) + -ment. Or possibly from Anglo-Latin cassementum, from casse. The "window" sense is from 1550s in English. Old folk etymology tended to make it gazement.

The Irish surname is originally Mc Casmonde (attested from 1429), from a misdivision of Mac Asmundr, from Irish mac "son of" + Old Norse Asmundr "god protector."
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conundrum (n.)

1590s, an abusive term for a person, perhaps meaning "a pedant;" c. 1600, "a whim;" 1640s, "pun or word-play," a word of unknown origin, said in 17c. to be Oxford University slang. Perhaps the sort of ponderous mock-Latin word that was once the height of humor in learned circles; Skeat suggests Latin conandrum "a thing to be attempted" as the source. Also spelled quonundrum.

From 1745 as "a riddle in which some odd resemblance is proposed between things quite unlike, the answer often involving a pun." (An example from 1745: "Why is a Sash-Window like a Woman in Labour? because 'tis full of Panes").

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sashimi (n.)

thin slices of raw fish served with ginger, soy sauce, etc., 1880, from Japanese, from sashi "to pierce" + mi "flesh."

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