Etymology
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sandwich (n.)

1762, said to be a reference to John Montagu (1718-1792), 4th Earl of Sandwich, who was said to be an inveterate gambler who ate slices of cold meat between bread at the gaming table during marathon sessions rather than rising for a proper meal (this account of the origin dates to 1770).

It also was in his honor that Cook named the Hawaiian islands (1778) when Montagu was first lord of the Admiralty (hence the occasional 19c. British Sandwicher for "a Hawaiian"). The family name is from the place in Kent, one of the Cinque Ports, Old English Sandwicæ, literally "sandy harbor (or trading center)." For pronunciation, see cabbage. Sandwich board, one before and one behind the carrier, is from 1864.

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sandwich (v.)

"insert between two other things," 1841, from sandwich (n.), on the image of meat pressed between identical pieces of bread. Related: Sandwiched; sandwiching.

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Hawaii 
from Hawaiian Hawai'i, from Proto-Polynesian *hawaiki. Said to mean "Place of the Gods" and be a reference to Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa. See also sandwich. Related: Hawaiian (1825). First record of Hawaiian shirt is from 1943.
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Big Mac 
trademark name (McDonald's Corp.) of a type of large hamburger sandwich; by 1968.
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hero (n.2)
1955, the New York City term for a sandwich elsewhere called submarine, grinder, poor boy (New Orleans), or hoagie (Philadelphia); origin unknown, perhaps so called for its great size (from hero (n.1)), or a folk-etymology alteration of Greek gyro as a type of sandwich.
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BLT (n.)

also B.L.T., type of sandwich, initialism for bacon, lettuce, and tomato, the ingredients; 1940s, American English.

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hoagie (n.)
American English (originally Philadelphia) word for "hero sandwich, large sandwich made from a long, split roll;" originally hoggie (c. 1936), traditionally said to be named for Big Band songwriter Hoagland Howard "Hoagy" Carmichael (1899-1981), but the use of the word pre-dates his celebrity and the original spelling seems to suggest another source (perhaps hog). Modern spelling is c. 1945, and might have been altered by influence of Carmichael's nickname.
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melt (n.)

1854, "molten metal, a substance in a melted condition," from melt (v.). In reference to a type of sandwich (typically tuna) topped by melted cheese, by 1956, American English.

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gyro (n.)
sandwich made from roasted lamb, 1971, originally the meat itself, as roasted on a rotating spit, from Modern Greek gyros "a circle" (see gyre (n.)). Mistaken in English for a plural and shorn of its -s.
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panini (n.)

by 1974, originally in an Italian context, where the word means "small bread rolls," typically filled sandwich style; plural of panino, a diminutive of pane "bread," from Latin panis "bread," from PIE root *pa- "to feed."  Used since c. 1980 on U.S. restaurant menus in reference to sandwiches made with a small flat loaf of Italian bread.

Today they have a well-established niche in any sandwich outlet. In the process of their Anglicization, their plurality has been a problem; increasingly panini is interpreted as singular, and a new plural paninis has been created .... [Ayto, "Diner's Dictionary"]
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