Etymology
Advertisement
salad (n.)

late 14c., salade, "raw herbs cut up and variously dressed," from Old French salade (14c.) and Medieval Latin salata, both from Vulgar Latin *salata, literally "salted," short for herba salata "salted vegetables" (vegetables seasoned with brine, a popular Roman dish), from fem. past participle of *salare "to salt," from Latin sal (genitive salis) "salt" (from PIE root *sal- "salt").

Dutch salade, German Salat, Swedish salat, Russian salat are from Romanic languages. Later extended to dishes composed of meat chopped and mixed with uncooked herbs and variously seasoned (chicken salad, etc.). In reference to the raw herbs and vegetables themselves, in U.S. it is colloquially limited to lettuce (by 1838).

Salad oil "olive oil used for dressing salads," is by 1550s. Salad-fork is by 1808. Salad bar is attested by 1940, American English. Salad days "time of youthful inexperience" (perhaps on notion of "green") was used by Shakespeare ("Antony and Cleopatra," 1606) and owes its survival, if not its existence, to him.

Whether the point is that youth, like salad, is raw, or that salad is highly flavoured & youth loves high flavours, or that innocent herbs are youth's food as milk is babes' & meat is men's, few of those who use the phrase could perhaps tell us ; if so, it is fitter for parrots' than for human speech. [Fowler]
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
slaw (n.)
"sliced cabbage," 1794, from Dutch sla, short for salade, from French salade (see salad).
Related entries & more 
cole-slaw (n.)

also coleslaw, cole slaw, "finely chopped cabbage dressed with vinegar, salt, etc. and eaten as a salad," 1794 ("A piece of sliced cabbage, by Dutchmen ycleped cold slaw"), American English, a partial translation of Dutch koolsla, literally "cabbage salad," from kool "cabbage" (see cole) + sla "salad" (see slaw). Cold slaw is a folk-etymology common until 1860s, when cole was revived in English.

Related entries & more 
tabbouli (n.)
also tabouli, tabbouleh, Middle Eastern vegetable salad, 1955, from Arabic tabbula.
Related entries & more 
guacamole (n.)

"avocado-based dip, spread, or salad," a Mexican dish, 1913, from American Spanish guacamole, originally Mexican, from Nahuatl (Aztecan) ahuaca-molli, from ahuacatl "avocado" + molli "sauce."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Roquefort 
type of cheese, 1837, from the village in the southwest of France, where it originally was made. Reference to salad dressing made from this kind of cheese is from 1943.
Related entries & more 
escarole (n.)

"lettuce-like salad vegetable" (a type of endive), 1897, from French escarole (13c., scariole), from Italian scariola, from Medieval Latin escariola "something edible," ultimately from Latin edere "to eat" (from PIE root *ed- "to eat").

Related entries & more 
remoulade (n.)

type of French salad dressing, 1845, from French rémoulade (17c.), from remolat, a dialect word for "horseradish;" compare Italian ramolaccio "horseradish," by dissimilation from ramoraccio, from Latin armoracia. "horseradish," from Greek armorakia.

Related entries & more 
toss (v.)
mid-15c., "to lift or throw with a sudden movement," of uncertain origin, possibly from a Scandinavian source (compare dialectal Norwegian tossa "to strew, spread"). Food preparation sense (with reference to salad, etc.) is recorded from 1723. Intransitive sense "be restless; throw oneself about" is from 1550s. Related: Tossed; tossing.
Related entries & more 
lettuce (n.)
garden herb extensively cultivated for use as a salad, late 13c., letuse, probably somehow from Old French laitues, plural of laitue "lettuce" (cognate with Spanish lechuga, Italian lattuga), from Latin lactuca "lettuce," from lac (genitive lactis) "milk" (from PIE root *g(a)lag- "milk"); so called for the milky juice of the plant. Old English had borrowed the Latin word as lactuce.
Related entries & more